Disability Services

Welcome to Disability Services at Central Community College. We are proud to be an educational institution that welcomes and supports all of our student body. Disability Services provides a wide array of accommodations for students with physical, psychological, medical, or learning disabilities. We welcome students to register and request accommodations.

Disability Services requires documentation of a disability to support the need for specific accommodations and to assist in the determination of individual needs. Students are expected to provide current documentation of their disability. Documentation may include an IEP, MDT, 504 Plan or documentation from the treating medical provider and include at a minimum a statement of diagnosis, length of treatment for diagnosis, functional limitations in activities of daily living, prescribed medications, and any other pertinent information.

Accommodations are not retroactive, so it is important to set up services as early as possible to secure all necessary accommodations.

Online Portal

For students who would like to apply for accommodations, please visit our Disability Services Point and Click Portal.

Requesting Accommodations 

  1. Student starts the process by applying through our online portal.
  2. Student uploads appropriate verifying disability documentation. Documentation may include an IEP, MDT, 504 Plan or documentation from the treating medical provider and include at a minimum a statement of diagnosis, length of treatment for diagnosis, functional limitations in activities of daily living, prescribed medications, and any other pertinent information.
  3. Student schedules an intake interview with disability services.
  4. Disability services evaluates individual’s request through an interview with the student. Disability services reviews documentation provided for history of accommodation use.
  5. Disability services and student together determine reasonable accommodations and create academic accommodation letters for faculty. The student is responsible for distributing the accommodation letter to their faculty every semester.

Examples of Accommodations

note-taking assistance including smart pens and audio recorders; testing accommodations including extended time, minimal distraction area, proctor, reader, and scribe; textbooks in alternative format, assistive technology, referrals to other CCC services, interpreter services, preferential seating in classroom.

Documentation of a Disability

  • Disability documentation about a student’s condition is used to support the higher education professional in establishing disability, understanding how a disability may impact a student, and making informed decisions about accommodations.
  • Disability services documentation guidelines are based on the recommendations of the Association of Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD).
  •  Documentation may include an IEP, MDT, 504 Plan or documentation from the treating medical provider and include at a minimum a statement of diagnosis, length of treatment for diagnosis, functional limitations in activities of daily living, prescribed medications, and any other pertinent information.
  • If the original documentation is incomplete or inadequate to determine the extent of the disability or reasonable accommodations, Central Community College has the discretion to require additional documentation.  Any cost incurred in obtaining additional documentation when the original records are inadequate is the responsibility of the student.

Disability Services Grievance Procedure

This procedure allows for equitable resolution within a reasonable time of complaints by students with disabilities who allege violation of their rights under the ADAAA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

In the event that you believe you have been discriminated against, want to appeal the approved accommodations, or have other concerns related to disability services, contact Central Community College's ADA Coordinator for procedures providing for prompt and equitable complaint resolution.

Christopher Waddle, JD
Title IX/Equity/AA/ADA/504 Coordinator
Division of Human Resources
3134 W Highway 34
Grand Island NE  68802-4903
308-398-7325
cwaddle@cccneb.edu

  • Federal Regulations
  • Early College High School Students
  • Helpful Tips
Federal Regulations

Assurance of equal educational opportunity rests upon legal foundations established by federal law, specifically the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 including Section 504, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended in 2008.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Amendments Act of 2008

Federal statutes govern the rights of individuals with disabilities.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) states that no “otherwise qualified person” with a disability can be excluded from, denied the benefits of or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity within an institution that receives federal financial aid.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (as amended, 2008) defines a person with a disability as any individual who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; has a record of such an impairment; or is perceived by others as having such an impairment.

Taken together, Section 504 and the ADA (and ADAAA) require institutions of higher education to provide equal access to educational opportunities to otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.

Reasonable Accommodations

Reasonable accommodations in college programs and services (auxiliary aides and services and academic adjustments) enable qualified students with a disability to have equal access to college programs, and equal opportunity to benefit from those programs and services.

Student

A student is a person enrolled at the college.

Qualified Student

A qualified student is one who, with or without reasonable accommodations, meets the academic and technical standards required for admission to, participation in and/or fulfilling the essential requirements of college programs or activities and who has provided appropriate documentation of his/her disability.

Student with a Disability

A student with a disability is one who has a physical, mental or sensory impairment that substantially limits one or more of his/her major life activities; has a record of such an impairment; or is regarded as having a disability.

Early College High School Students

Central Community College and Early College Courses for Students with IEP’s and 504 Plans

High school students who enroll in early college courses are eligible to receive academic accommodations.  Students may take a course in their own high school classroom, online or at one of our campuses or centers.  Regardless of where the course is taken at, if it is for college credit, the student will need to register with the Central Community College (CCC) Disability Services office and request CCC accommodations.

Online Portal

For students who would like to apply for accommodations, please visit our Disability Services Point and Click portal.

What is the process for requesting and receiving accommodations in early college courses?

The student follows the Central Community College process which includes:

  1. Student starts the process by applying through our online portal.
  2. Student uploads appropriate verifying disability documentation. Documentation may include an IEP, MDT, 504 Plan or documentation from the treating medical provider and include at a minimum a statement of diagnosis, length of treatment for diagnosis, functional limitations in activities of daily living, prescribed medications and any other pertinent information.
  3. Student schedules an intake interview with a disability services director.  This can be done in person, or via phone and WebEx. Student’s may have a parent, high school counselor or special education teacher assist them in this process as a transition service.
  4. Disability services evaluates individual requests through an interview with the student. Disability services reviews documentation provided for history of accommodation use.
  5. Disability Services Director and student together determine reasonable accommodations and create academic accommodation letters for faculty.  The student is responsible for distributing the accommodation letter to their faculty every semester.

Do accommodations in the student’s IEP or 504 plan automatically apply to early college classes?

No. It is important to remember that the IEP and the high school 504 plans does not continue in college. Some accommodations provided at the high school may also be appropriate at the college level. However, in high school there may be supports and services provided that go beyond a reasonable accommodation because they would modify the learning objectives and outcomes. College curriculum is not modified for any student, with or without disabilities.

Does the IEP team make decisions about accommodations provided in early college classes?

No. The IEP team plays a key role in providing recommendations and documentation for requested accommodations in high school. Decisions about the accommodations provided in college classes will be determined by the Disability Services Office at Central Community College. Teachers should not use the high school IEP or 504 plan interventions in any early college class and instead should refer to the CCC Accommodation Letter.

Commonly considered reasonable accommodations in college: note-taking assistance including smart pens and audio recorders, testing accommodations including extended time, minimal distraction area, proctor, reader, scribe, textbooks in alternative format, assistive technology, referrals to other CCC services, interpreter services, preferential seating in classroom.

Commonly not considered reasonable accommodations in college: modified tests, alternate tests, word banks, use of an aide or para-educator, reduction of course requirements i.e., fewer problems, pages or lessened assignments, small group testing, modified grading scale. 

How will compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) be addressed in early college programs?

Early college courses (college) are only covered by 504/ADAA.  Participation in a early college course is considered to be a choice on the part of the student. Therefore, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requirements concerning a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) do not apply.  Since the requirements under the IDEA do not apply to the postsecondary level, services described in the IEP would not be required for early college courses. In K-12, IDEA is an educational benefit law that offers additional services and protections for those with disabilities that are not offered to those without disabilities. In College, the ADA is a civil rights law that levels the playing field for persons with disabilities by requiring the elimination of barriers that prevent comparable access.

Disability Services Office Contacts

Columbus and Ord area:  402-562-1240

Grand Island, Kearney, and Lexington area:  308-398-7423

Hastings and Holdrege area:  402-461-2423

Helpful Tips

Helpful Links

Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD)

Western Iowa and Nebraska AHEAD (WinAHEAD)

Americans with Disabilities Act

Office for Civil Rights (U.S. Department of Education)

Transition Resources on the Internet

Career Guide for People with Disabilities

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking and Technology

Comparison of Disability in High School and College

High School College
Under the law (IDEA), all children (including children with disabilities) are entitled to a “Free and Appropriate Public Education.”(IDEA is about education) Under the law (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act), students have equal access to education – no one is entitled to anything; students have civil rights and they must advocate for themselves in order to utilize those rights. 
(Section 504 is about civil rights)
Section 504 in the public schools includes “Free and Appropriate Public Education” language, and accommodations may include modifications or changes in the curriculum, assignments or tests. Section 504 is the first civil rights legislation that applied to colleges. It upholds the institution’s right to maintain the academic standards, and no accommodations may be permitted to reduce that standard for any student. In other words, the integrity of any program will not be compromised by changes or modifications for any student.
Plans, either the IEP or a 504 Plan, drive all services and accommodations, involve school staff and require a parent’s signature. There is no plan, and instructors are not contacted, except by the student. In fact, parents may not even receive a student’s grades without the student giving written permission.
All students qualify for public education simply by being the appropriate age “Otherwise qualified,” in college, means that the student must meet all entrance and academic requirements, whether they receive accommodations or not.
Staff members involved with the student know about his/her placement, know about a student even before he or she enters the classroom, and have a good idea of that student’s needs.  DSS never contacts an instructor without permission from the student. Thus, the student must initiate all actions regarding accommodations with each instructor for each course every semester. Students also have the right to refuse accommodations and if they do not request accommodations, it’s assumed they do not need or want them. 
Public schools, for the most part, are responsible for appropriate assessment of a student’s disability, primarily to determine if that student qualifies for special education. Higher education is not required to assess the student but may request that the student provide information about their disability and accommodation needs. This may include third-party documentation. 
Some subjects may have been waived for a student before graduation, if they were specifically related to the student’s disability, and was indicated in the IEP. Substitutions for specific graduation requirements may be requested by following a rigorous petition process, but “waivers” for requirements are never granted. Substitutions are also granted typically after the student has both provided adequate verification to DSS of their disability and unsuccessfully attempted the courses in question with the appropriate accommodations as recommended by DSS. 
Labels (or the type of disability/diagnosis) are a way to categorize people and are needed to verify the student for special education services. Student has a right to disclose when and to whom they choose, but must own their disability in order to receive accommodations and enjoy a level playing field.  There is no special education, only accommodations.
Assessment, physical or other therapy, or personal care may be provided by the school while the student is in school. Student is responsible for personal services – personal care, medical and related requirements, just as if they would if they were living independently and not attending school.
Students often receive “Un-timed tests” if they have a disability. “Un-timed tests” are not reasonable, but time extensions may be reasonable, typically time-and-a-half or double time.
Teachers may be expected to learn all they can about the disability of a student in one of their classes. Instructors need know only that which applies to the accommodations the student is eligible for.
“Placement” is determined by the child’s “team” and outlined in the plan and must, by law, occur in the least restrictive environment. Placement integration is assumed, and is the order of the day. We adjust the environment through accommodations, but we don’t deliberate and select the environment for the student in advance. 
  • MDT = Multidisciplinary Team Evaluation
  • DSS = Disability Services for Students
  • IEP = Individual Education Plan

IDEA vs. ADA

Issue IDEA (High School) ADA (College)
Identification School Student
Assessment School Student
Making Requests School/Parent Student
Advocacy School/Parent Student
Decision Making School/Parent Student
Transition Plan School Student
Accommodations School College

Activities and Facilities

All Central Community College activities, organizations, courses and academic and technical programs are open to all students. College facilities, as a whole, are accessible to persons with physical disabilities via ramps, automatic entrances and elevators. Accessible restroom facilities, parking spaces and water fountains are also available. Individuals who are attending a Central Community College sponsored event should let the sponsoring organization or department know of any disability or interpreting needs. Two weeks’ notice is preferred for most requests.

Contact

Columbus and Ord area

CoLynn Paprocki
402-562-1240
colynnpaprocki@cccneb.edu

Grand Island, Kearney and Lexington area

Kim Ottman
308-398-7423
kimottman@cccneb.edu 

Hastings and Holdrege area

Michelle Lubken
402-461-2423
mlubken@cccneb.edu