2022 Board of Governors Minutes

January 20, 2022

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
January 20, 2022

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sandra Borden called the Jan. 20, 2022, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with eight board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – absent
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – absent
Keller – present
Miller – absent
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present                                  

POLICY ITEMS

Borden announced the slate of officers for 2022. They are as follows:

  • John A. Novotny, Chair
  • Rita Skiles, Vice Chair
  • Tom Pirnie, Secretary
  • Linda Heiden, Treasurer

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY COWAN to accept the slate of officers.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

New chair John Novotny presented outgoing chair, Sandra Borden, with an appreciation plaque for her service, dedication and leadership to the board.

He also asked for volunteers and then appointed Diane Keller and Rita Skiles as Nebraska Community College Association (NCCA) representatives and Michelle Broekemier, Roger Davis and Diane Keller as Enrollment and Financial Audit Committee members for 2022.

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Novotny asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Sandra Borden will review the claims prior to the Feb. 17, 2022, board meeting in Hastings.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Novotny asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items. Pirnie requested that the semi-tractor and truck driving equipment be moved.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for Jan. 20, 2022.
  2. Minutes of the Dec. 16, 2021, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Dec. 1 through Dec. 31, 2021, totaling $5,623,247.56.
  4. Financial report as of Dec. 31, 2021.
  5. Purchases:
    Semi-Tractor, Hastings: The College President recommends the search and purchase of a vehicle, meeting the designated specifications and in an amount not to exceed $80,000, for a used semi‐tractor for the truck driving program.
    Truck Driving Equipment, Hastings: The College President recommends the search and purchase of a trailer, meeting the designated specifications and in an amount not to exceed $30,000, for a used trailer for the truck driving program.
  6. Personnel: None.

MOVED BY SKILES; SECONDED BY KELLER to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Academic Education Report

Dr. Amy Mancini, dean of academic education, reported about a course that was introduced a year and a half ago to address a shortage of substitute teachers because of an increase in teacher retirements, a decrease in retirees returning to substitute teach and a decline in graduates from teacher education programs. In Nebraska, individuals who have 60 college credits and complete a human relations course can earn a Local Substitute Certificate, which allows them to teach 90 days per school year for a district. CCC stepped up to get people through the process by offering a one-credit, two-week online human relations course. CCC has offered 26 sections of the class since the 2020 fall semester with an enrollment of 686 people.

Capital Improvement Report

Craig Boroff, college facilities manager, gave a report on ADA/hazardous material, capital improvement and revenue bond projects that are part of the 2022-23 budget.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Howard ADA Ramp/Railing Replacement

The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Carmichael Construction for $54,320.00 to provide all labor and material to replace the Howard ADA ramp and railing on the Hastings Campus.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the bid from Carmichael Construction for the Howard ADA ramp and railing.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Hastings Roof Replacements

The College President recommends acceptance of the low bid from Prairie View Roofing, from Kearney, Nebraska, for $414,700.00 to provide the labor and material for the roof replacements project on the Hastings Campus.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to accept the bid from Prairie View Roofing for roof replacement projects on the Hastings Campus.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

The following two items were moved by request from the consent items.

Semi-Tractor

The College President recommends the search and purchase of a vehicle, meeting the designated specifications and in an amount not to exceed $80,000, for a used semi‐tractor for the truck driving program.

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY BORDEN to approve the search for and purchase of a used semi-tractor for the truck driving program.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Truck Driving Equipment

The College President recommends the search and purchase of a trailer, meeting the designated specifications and in an amount not to exceed $30,000, for a used trailer for the truck driving program.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to approve the search for and purchase of a used trailer for the truck driving program.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Janel Walton, dean of enrollment management, shared the following information:

  • Nebraska Career Scholarships Program: The scholarships are designed to train students for high-wage, high-demand and high-skill careers. To be eligible, individuals must be first-time college students and new to the college they are attending. The exception is for early college students, who are eligible to attend the same institution once they are out of high school. The scholarship is worth $5,000 a year and is renewable up to three years. Funds can be used for tuition; fees; required tools, equipment and books; and room and board. CCC requires recipients to be full-time students and to maintain a 2.0 GPA co continue to receive the funds. In the 2021 fall semester, $77,381 was awarded to 33 students, and in the 2022 spring semester, $102,535 has been awarded to 44 students.
  • JBS Better Futures Program: The participation is limited to one team member or dependent per semester. They may attend classes at any CCC location. During the 2021 fall semester, 60 students participated in the program and JBS invested $26,444 in their education. During the 2022 spring semester, 40 students are participating the program and JBS has invested $15,723. These numbers are expected to increase as the spring semester progresses.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • The fall semester ended with us up in enrollment and that has carried over to the spring semester with official numbers coming out next week following free drop/add. We continue to see a trend of growing part-time, distance students.
  • Unfortunately, COVID numbers are on the rise with both employees and students, yet we remain open and able to provide coverage as needed. Faculty, staff and administrators continue to do an excellent job of making adjustments and working to provide quality experiences even in pandemic times.
  • Much of December and January has been spent with state legislative issues, bills and funding proposals due to a wide range of bills introduced to date or in development. These range from eliminating community college board levy authority for operating expenses to $90 million in federal ARPA funds for community colleges, $50 million in additional apprenticeship and internship funds, $15 million for dual credit scholarships, moving Nebraska Career Scholarship funding from biennial appropriations to state law, to additional scholarships for nursing students.  
  • The NCCA Legislative Day is set for Feb. 3.
  • I attended and thanked the governor personally at his GI Fly In, which followed his State-of-the-State address and where he announced including $90 million for Nebraska community colleges as part of his ARPA budget request. That now goes to the legislature for changes or approval.
  • I visited CCC-Lexington last week and spoke with the approximate 20 CCC employees participating in the eight-month Excellence in Leadership program that is designed to educate and inspire future leaders at CCC from all employee groups and all campuses.
  • The AMDT faculty and students were featured in the MoldMaking Technology magazine for January 2022. Great testimonies and involvement of individuals affiliated with that program.
  • I will attend the ACCT National Legislative Summit in Washington, D.C., Feb. 6-9. The Rural Community College Association is also meeting on that last day in conjunction with ACCT to discuss funding opportunities for rural and small community colleges.
  • The welding program and extended learning services department hosted a one-day short course on Saturday, Jan. 8, to provide training for the Nebraska Blacksmith’s Welders and Machinists Association. Participants came from Nebraska, Iowa and Kansas.  
  • Heavy equipment operator students will be recognized Jan. 20 at the Nebraska Land Improvement Contractors Association (N-LICA) with scholarships. This has been an annual event and the recognition so greatly appreciated. 
  • The truck driving program is working with the Nebraska Department of Transportation to assist students with completing new federal regulations and guidelines that take effect in February 2022.
  • The construction program will be completing their first townhomes as part of the Hastings Economic Development project. The goal is to have them finished in April with a sale occurring in May prior to starting on another townhome.
  • Unfortunately, extreme cold weather caused pipes to freeze in the ceiling and caused damage to the Woodlands Dining area in Hastings. Temporary arrangements have been made for the hospitality and culinary students to use other rooms with the goal of getting back into that space by March.
  • All program faculty from all campuses participated in annual Assessment of Student Learning meetings in January with final reports due in May. I appreciate the faculty and staff involved in documenting these important measures of student learning and success.
  • An open house for the new Grand Island Entrepreneurship Center will be held Feb. 15. The time is still being finalized and will be held in cooperation with the chamber.
  • CCC and Wayne State College will hold a signing ceremony Jan. 24 to announce a new transfer agreement designed to assist working adults complete bachelor of technology and other degrees.
  • Dr. Wallace continues as a board member on the Hastings Economic Development Council as does Dr. Kemnitz on the Grand Island Chamber of Commerce Board and Dr. Fuchser on the Columbus Area Chamber of Commerce Board. I appreciate their active involvement and leadership in these important community-based groups.
  • CCC entered into an agreement with Harvard High School to loan some advanced manufacturing equipment to help build a manufacturing pathway.
  • Health programs continue to work with collecting vaccination records or waivers from students and faculty. They’re working with multiple clinical partners in Kearney, Columbus and Grand Island to remain in compliance with clinical requirements They’re also collecting other regular immunization documents for TB and flu, per clinical requirements. Nursing is preparing for the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) March 1-3. CCC received a good report from the state accreditation visit this fall. The fall nursing advisory board meeting was held Dec. 6, 2021.
  • We will be opening summer registration as early as March with registration for the 2022 fall semester beginning in April to provide more time for students to plan for classes.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Novotny requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues at 2:30 p.m.

MOVED BY BORDEN, SECONDED BY DAVIS that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues after a 10-minute break.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny reconvened the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting at 2:48 p.m.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY BORDEN to adjourn.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye  

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny declared the meeting adjourned at 2:49 p.m.

February 17, 2022

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
February 17, 2022

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Hall Student Union, Cottonwood Room, at Central Community College-Hastings, 550 S. Technical Blvd., Hastings, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair John Novotny called the Feb. 17, 2022, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with nine board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – absent
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – present (arrived at 1:02 p.m.)
Novotny – present
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – present 

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Novotny asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Michelle Broekemier will review the claims prior to the March 17, 2022, board meeting in Grand Island.

Public Participation

Novotny requested that members of the audience register with Scott Miller, college communications senior director, if they wanted to address the board during the Public Participation segment.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Novotny asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for Feb. 17, 2022.
  2. Minutes of the Jan. 20, 2022, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Jan. 1 through Jan. 31, 2022, totaling $8,627,966.77.
  4. Financial report as of Jan. 31, 2022.
  5. Purchases:
    North Ed Center Roof Replacement, Columbus: The College President recommends acceptance of the low bid from Bierman Contracting from Columbus, Nebraska, for $347,694.00 to provide the labor and material for the roof replacements project on the Columbus Campus.
  6. Personnel: None.
  7. Borden had reviewed the January claims and found them in order. MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY COWAN to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye 

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Foundation Report

Dean Moors, executive director of the Central Community College Foundation, presented the following:

  • Consolidated assets as of January 31, 2022, were $42.1 million.
  • Newly established scholarships include the Mick and Janelle Grabowski Scholarship, Ken Wortman Scholarship, Pitcher Scholarship, Doug Pawloski Memorial Scholarship and Glenn Hunnicutt Electrical Scholarship.
  • Jeanne Schieffer of Columbus has joined the board. She is a freelance copywriter and communications consultant and past president of the Columbus Area Chamber of Commerce.
  • Major gifts campaigns include the advanced manufacturing design technology addition, welding renovation and AMDT/welding endowed scholarship fund at the Hastings Campus and the Center for Science and Technology construction and endowed scholarship fund at the Columbus Campus.
  • Updates were given on the Generations of Impact project, the occupational therapy assistant inclusive playground campaign, the yearend appeal and alumni giving.
  • The 32nd annual CCC Foundation Pro-Am Tournament will be held Sept. 12 at the Elks Country Club in Columbus.

Hastings Campus Report

Campus President Dr. Jerry Wallace complimented the media arts students on the 2020-21 Hastings Campus annual report they produced.

Sean Griffin, associate dean of students presented the following information:

  • Leapfrog Village, which was started in February 2021, provides guided activities that parents can do with their children and then take home as an alternative to screen time. Events to date have included a Valentine’s Day craft night, book reading and nature walk, Fun with Food Night, Halloween and St. Martin’s Day in Hastings as well as a picnic in Grand Island. In December 2021, Light Up Campus was a collaboration across multiple departments and community partners that drew 285 to 300 attendees and nearly 50 student volunteers.
  • The Food and Hygiene Pantry has relocated to the Dawson Building, Room 227, and has a new refrigerator/freezer. It now provides recipe cards and meal kits and arranged activities in association with National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week in November 2021 and Random Acts of Kindness Week in February 2022.
  • The campus also sponsored its most popular virtual speaker, Holocaust survivor Peter Stein, in January 2021; a first-year residential experience as part of New Student Orientation; and a career fair.

Adam Turpin of Bassett, a second-year student in the heavy equipment operator technician program, said it’s a real-world training program that is giving him the experience he needs to get a job and succeed in the field. He expressed his appreciation for the college offering the program, which is the only one of its kind in Nebraska.

Also speaking about the program were Allison Feeney, associate dean of skilled and technical sciences; Matt McCann, HEOT program director; and Jason Baker, HEOT instructor. They shared the following information:

  • The program started in fall 2016 and has 12 pieces of leased equipment and two pieces of CCC-owned equipment. It also has six full-motion Platform CAT HEOT simulators in the classroom.
  • This year, full-time HEOT students include 16 in their first year and one in his second year. As part of their education, students will earn a National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Class B CDL and OSHA 10-hour certificate.
  • Scholarships awarded from Nebraska land contracting agencies include three Associated General Contractors of America $4,000 scholarships, five NUCA $1,000 scholarships, and six Land Improvement Contractors of America $500 scholarships. Over the past six years, more than 105 program-specific scholarships have been awarded, totaling $126,000.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Scott Miller stated no one had signed in for Public Participation.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Capital Improvement Budget

Joel King gave an overview of the projects included in the capital improvement budget. The College President asked for tentative approval of the 2022-23 capital improvement budget so these projects can be started. Official approval of the budget is set for September.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to give tentative approval to the capital improvement budget.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Tuition, Fees, Board and Room Rates for 2022-23

Joel King reported that tuition will increase by $2 per credit hour and fees by $1 per credit hour for 2022-23. Board will be raised by 6.9% as per CCC’s contract with Chartwells. Room rates will remain the same. An Early College change will set tuition within a range of $0 to $94 dependent on the high school’s ability to cover instructional costs. All Early College students will be charged the general fees at $16 per credit hour.

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY DAVIS to accept the tuition, fees, room and board rates for 2022-23.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Faculty Negotiated Agreement

Dr. Chris Waddle presented the negotiated agreement between the CCC Education Association and the CCC Board of Governors for the contract years 2022-23, 2023-24 and 2024-25.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY HEIDEN to approve the faculty negotiated agreement for the years 2022-25.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye 

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

CCC/UNK Housing Agreement

Dr. Marcie Kemnitz presented information on an agreement in development with the University of Nebraska-Kearney to implement a pilot housing program that will give CCC students the opportunity to live on the UNK campus. Participating students must be 25 years or younger, enrolled full-time at CCC, seeking a degree and be in good academic standing. They must commit to UNK housing for one full academic year (fall and spring semesters) and will be charged current published room rates. They also will have the option of purchasing a commuter meal plan from UNK Dining Services and of opting into other UNK services by paying the associated fees.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to authorize the College President to negotiate and enter into an agreement with UNK officials to have UNK provide housing opportunities to CCC students.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye 

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Business Technology Teach Out

Dr. Candace Walton and Dr. Jerry Wallace presented the college’s three-year teach out plan for the business technology program in compliance with the Higher Learning Commission’s expectations for accredited institutions. Several of the business technology courses will be offered through the business administration program as electives and so will two certificates that previously offered under the business technology program.

MOVED BY MILLER, SECONDED BY AERNI to approve initiation of the college’s three-year teach out plan for the business technology program in compliance with the Higher Learning Commission’s expectations for accredited institutions.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Candace Walton gave an overview of the 2021 Employee Engagement Survey. Highlights included:

  • The survey was conducted between November 22 and December 31 and had responses from 278 of the 585 full- and part-time employees invited to participate for a response rate of 47.5%.
  • Opinions were highly positive on the topics, which included employee engagement related to student and community success; satisfaction with tasks, duties and responsibilities assigned to their jobs; and having the necessary time, technology and resources for their jobs. Questions also were asked on work-related stress, finding joy at work, communication with their direct supervisor and with the college president, and the COVID-19 response.
  • The 2021 survey focused on the overall college as well as specific departments: environmental health and safety, extended learning services, facilities management, grants, payroll, and print and mail services.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

  • I’m very pleased to announce a drastic drop in COVID cases reported by both students and employees after a spike in January. Several protocols continue, but cases are dropping throughout our area communities.
  • Much of January and early February was spent with state legislative issues and funding proposals due to a wide range of bills introduced to date or in development. The NCCA legislative day proceeded, and later Diane Keller and I presented at a hearing for LB 873.  Hearings and legislative debate will continue through April. There is strong support for the ARPA funding request for the community colleges, but it’s not finalized yet. I have met with Senators Aguilar, Halloran, Moser and Briese or their staff.
  • I attended the ACCT National Legislative Summit and went along with NECC’s visits to Congressmen Bacon and Fortenberry and Senators Fischer and Sasse. We had good meetings with our delegates and also heard from First Lady Dr. Jill Biden, the U.S. Secretary of Labor and U.S. Secretary of Education and representatives from U.S. Department of Agriculture and the White House. The last day of the summit was designated for small and rural colleges with good presentations and networking regarding issues involving colleges like ours. The AACC/ACCT Community College Federal Legislative Priorities show some positive developments already in both the Congress and Senate regarding expanded short-term Pell grant opportunities for programs under one year in length (like truck driving).
  • Congressman Adrian Smith toured CCC-Lexington this past month and learned more about our adult education program and Tyson mechatronics project there.
  • We held a successful signing with Wayne State College that highlighted up to 80 credits from CCC that can be transferred to WSC to pursue a bachelor of applied science degree in industrial technology that will be a benefit to many of our AAS majors. It’s also a great opportunity especially for alumni living and working throughout our service area.
  • Eight CCC representatives attended the Kearney Area Chamber Banquet where CCC Foundation Board member Jon Abegglan was honored as one of the award winners.
  • I participated as a presenter and panelist at the Grand Island Chamber Young Professionals State of the City address this week.
  • After forty years of service, Area Financial Aid Director Vicki Kucera is retiring so her position is being posted to provide time for overlap training time.
  • Over 3,900 high school seniors are being called regarding reminders of Central Visit Days to be held on each of our campuses.
  • Grand Island Student Veteran Association members are participating in quick reaction force opportunities to help fellow veterans deal with emergencies in our area, such as organizing an honor guard for a local veteran funeral. These are coordinated with other local veteran support groups.
  • With the start of the spring semester, the Academic Success Center personnel in Columbus have promoted their services to over 45 classes. These include tutoring, test prep, anti-stress techniques, writing coaches and study areas.
  • An open house for the new Grand Island Entrepreneurship Center was held February 15 with great attendance including several members of the Chamber of Commerce, college and community.
  • The Nebraska Nurse Association is holding an event February 24 where many of our faculty and students will learn more about nursing’s current role, challenges, policies, team-based nursing models for patient care and how legislative policies area made for nursing in health care in the State of Nebraska.
  • The human services faculty have worked closely with the University of Nebraska-Kearney faculty on a new 2+2 agreement that will be finalized and announced this spring. It will create a pathway for our CCC generalist and drug and alcohol counseling majors to transfer into a UNK social work program.
  • Occupational therapy assistant students are engaging in many community-based projects this spring. These include helping Kearney Mid-Nebraska Individual Services create a sensory room for clients, helping with a special needs formal gala at the Kearney Archway, promoting OTA profession at Schuyler Central High School, and providing sensory kits for local day care centers and a school in Central City.
  • Dental hygiene second-year students are resuming rotations at nursing homes, Head Start, VA Hospital, elementary schools, Heartland Health and Third City Clinic.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Novotny requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues at 2:49 p.m. after a short break.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny reconvened the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting at 3:34 p.m.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY COWAN to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny declared the meeting adjourned at 3:35 p.m. 

March 17, 2022

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
March 17, 2022

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair John Novotny called the March 17, 2022, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with seven board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – absent
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – absent
Novotny – present
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – absent  

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Novotny asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Sam Cowan will review the claims prior to the April 21, 2022, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Novotny asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included: 

  1. Agenda for March 17, 2022.
  2. Minutes of the Feb. 17, 2022, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Feb. 1 through Feb. 28, 2022, totaling $3,326,097.06.
  4. Financial report as of Feb. 28, 2022.
  5. Purchases:
    Platte Parking Lot Replacement, Hastings: The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Van Kirk Contracting for $639,924.50 to provide all labor and material to replace the Platte parking lot on the Hastings Campus.
  6. Personnel: None.
  7. iMEC 2.0 Grant Project Purchase: Due to time constraints, Dr. Gotschall approved the amount of $93,596.80 to Kriz Davis for this project as part of the iMEC2.0 grant project funded entirely by grant and private industry donations. Dr. Gotschall asks for board affirmation of approval of this purchase.

MOVED BY BROEKEMIER, SECONDED BY COWAN to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – absent

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Training and Development Report

Dr. Kelly Christensen, dean of training and Kearney Center administrator, gave an overview of the training and development department before introducing the following people:

  • Doug Pauley, associate dean of training and development, reported on the National Center for Next Generation Manufacturing. CCC was asked to participate because of its mechatronics, instrumentation and plastic injection molding programs. Three other colleges in California, Florida and Ohio were also asked to be part of the five-year grant.
  • Craig Potthast, advanced manufacturing plastics trainer and coordinator, highlighted the new Business Industry Leadership Team; state‐of‐the‐art learning laboratory and plastics engineering technology certificate; the certification of two individuals to teach injection molding workshops; and the injection molding program’s role in producing face shield frames that were part of 17,000 face shields provided to Nebraska health districts to combat the spread of COVID‐19.
  • Potthast shared an email from Jason Bazer, who enrolled in CCC’s plastic molding program in spring 2020 after spending 25 years as a welder. He completed his master molder license in 2021 and now works as a mold technician at BD Medical.

Health Sciences Report

Sarah Kort, dean of health sciences introduced the following speakers:

  • Dr. Callie Watson, director of the occupational therapy assistant program, gave an overview of the community class, which allows OTA students to do hands-on projects such as sensory rooms, pathways and kits; memory care dementia sensory pouches; and calming stations. These projects have benefitted Grand Island, Hastings, Aurora, Giltner and several other smaller communities. Past projects included Bikes and Trykes of Central Nebraska, a Tiffany Square black-tie dinner, and health and wellness seminars.
  • OTA student Katrina Gomez, spoke about the project she and a fellow student are doing as part of the community class: a sensory room for a day care center in Central City. She said the room will provide a nice place for kids with special needs or for kids who just need a place to relax. She described the community class as giving her an opportunity to see what can be done in a community with an OTA degree and that the project has been a rewarding process.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Full-time Salary and Classified Wages and Benefits for 2022-23

The wage and benefit recommendation for 2022‐23 is as follows:

  • Full-time classified and contracted employees retained for the 2022‐23 year will be eligible to receive a wage increase. An amount up to the equivalent of 3.0% of total wages will be set aside for compensation.
  • Employees hired after April 1, 2022, or salaried employees who exceed the current maximum rate for their grade will not be eligible for an increase. Salaried employees who will exceed the maximum rate as a result of the increase will be adjusted to the maximum rate. Hourly employees who have exceeded their maximum rate for their grade will still be eligible for an increase of 1.5% of their current rate.
  • Employees eligible to receive additional vacation days due to longevity may have the opportunity to get those additional days cashed out on the month after their anniversary month.
  • Health and dental insurance premiums are estimated to increase 5.84% over the next year. This equates to an increase of approximately $501,467.
  • All other benefits will remain in place without change.

MOVED BY Keller, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve the full-time salary and classified wages and benefits recommendation for 2022-23.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – absent

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Brian McDermott, college effectiveness research director, shared information from the 2021 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data (IPED) Feedback Report. CCC uses a custom comparison group that includes the five other community colleges in Nebraska as well as 10 colleges in Colorado, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri with similar characteristics to CCC. Among some of the findings:

  • Part-time enrollment at CCC was significantly higher than the comparison colleges, and full-time was close to being on par.
  • CCC’s unduplicated headcount was about 1,000 more students compared to peers.
  • CCC was slightly behind in associate degrees but awarded more diplomas and significantly more certificates.
  • CCC was in range with the other Nebraska community colleges when it came to the cost of tuition and fees but was significantly less expensive compared to out-of-state colleges.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • Much of March continues to be spent with state legislative issues due to a wide range of bills introduced to date or in development.
  • I facilitated a Hastings Campus visit from the Suzanne and Walter Scott Foundation, which is considering sponsoring students in select high skill, demand and wage careers.
  • March wraps my year as president of the Heartland United Way Board. I will continue to serve on the executive board as past chair and serve three more years on the board.
  • I’ve received a reappointment letter as a Higher Learning Commission peer reviewer through 2026.
  • I participated in a UNL study on rural community development strategies and in White House and U.S. Department of Education briefings regarding pandemic relief funds and other national initiatives that included infrastructure and rural service area funding.
  • Nine CCC employees received the League Excellence Award from the League of Innovation in Community Colleges for their work on innovative program, projects or grants that have brought positive recognition to CCC on a state or national level. They were Keith Vincik, Sherry Desel, Michael David, Marni Danhauer, Ronnie O’Brien, Ben Newton, Randell Manning, Diana Watson and Jerry Muller.
  • I coordinated a meeting with JBS regarding a proposed leadership/management development program they would like to implement at CCC.
  • I participated in the national nursing accreditation visit by ACEN in early March. The final report will not be returned to CCC until about September 2022.
  • I sent board information emails along with my contact information to non-incumbent CCC board candidates Dan Quick and Wayne Nestor.
  • 1,022 scholarship applications were received this spring, up from 913 last year.
  • Dr. Callie Watson was recognized and honors as the 2022 Occupational Therapy Practitioner of the Year by the Nebraska Occupational Therapy Association at their conference in February.
  • The nursing program is hosting their annual job fair today (March 17) at College Park. Employers will be present in person in the morning, and afternoon sessions will include graduation information, preparation for nursing boards, student pictures and a luncheon.
  • Dental Hygiene students will be taking their national boards in early March in Lincoln.
  • Luz Colin-Rodriguez, director of counseling and prevention education, completed the annual Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program notification. It can be found at https://www.cccneb.edu/globalassets/documents/student-life/policies-and-procedures/daapp.pdf .
  • CCC has again achieved the 2022-23 Military Friendly award for being in the Top Ten of small community colleges and at the highest status level of “gold.” Out of the 125 small colleges ranked, there were 12 Bronze, 78 Silver (included Northeast and Western Nebraska community colleges), 25 Gold and the top 10. Overall, CCC was ninth out of 125! This is one of two awards the VMRC aggressively strives to achieve each year to prove our commitment to veterans, service members and their families.
  • Kearney Center staff hosted 401 Kearney ninth graders for tours in February.
  • The Career Opportunity Fair on the Columbus Campus was held on March 9 and brought over 320 students from 15 local schools to the Columbus Campus.
  • ACTIONS Day was held on March 16 at the Hastings Campus. A total of 567 students from over a dozen area high schools registered for the competition.
  • Welding students from all three campuses, instructors and Associate Dean Alison Feeney attended a welding competition at North Central Technical College in Beloit, KS, on March 2.
  • Hastings Public Schools in cooperation with CCC held a Manufacturing Madness event to promote manufacturing careers on March 15.
  • Signing days for students making commitments to CCC in skilled and technical sciences, business or health programs will be held April 20 at the Columbus Campus, April 21 at the Kearney Center, April 22 at the Grand Island Campus and April 27 at the Hastings Campus.
  • Electrical technology (ELTR) classes are being offered three nights a week at the Kearney Center for students to complete an ELTR certificate over two semesters.
  • Agriculture instructors and college staff collectively hosted thousands of students on all three campuses for District FFA contests in March.
  • Columbus entrepreneurship staff members are working with the Chamber of Commerce and University of Nebraska Extension to host a Connecting Entrepreneurship Communities event in Columbus in late April.
  • Dr. Jerry Wallace and the career services department will host manufacturing and welding employers from 10 a.m. to noon on April 12 in the Hamilton Building on the Hastings Campus. Students will bring their resumes and the employers will conduct interviews.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Novotny requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues at 2:36 p.m. after a short break.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY HEIDEN that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – absent

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny reconvened the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting at 3:17 p.m.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY KELLER to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – absent

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny declared the meeting adjourned at 3:18 p.m. 

April 21, 2022

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
April 21, 2022

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair John Novotny called the April 21, 2022, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with nine board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present 

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Novotny asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Roger Davis will review the claims prior to the May 19, 2022, board meeting in Lexington.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Novotny asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included: 

  1. Agenda for April 21, 2022.
  2. Minutes of the March 17, 2022, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from March 1 through March 31, 2022, totaling $7,036,686.06.
  4. Financial report as of March 31, 2022.
  5. Purchases:
    Agricultural Desktop Devices, Columbus and Hastings: The CCC agriculture program is purchasing 24 laptop computers, 12 each for Columbus and Hastings. A variety of ag-related software will be imaged on these devices for student use. The amount of $40,000.00 was budgeted for this project as part of the COVID relief dollars. The college will use its contract with HP to purchase the laptops. The College President recommends moving forward with this purchase under the established guidelines of the COVID committee recommendations.
  6. Personnel:
    Ryan Jones: The College President recommends Ryan Jones be offered the position of advanced manufacturing design technology instructor in Hastings, effective August 1, 2022.
    Allen Stenzel: Allen Stenzel, mechatronics instructor, submitted a report on the sabbatical he took during the 2021 fall semester. He created 50 lab videos with 18 hours of content for use in the INDT 1200, INDT 2060 and INDT 2240 classes. He plans to also create lecture videos.

MOVED BY COWAN SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Skilled and Technical Sciences Report

Dr. Nate Allen, dean of skilled and technical sciences, gave an introduction to the STS division, which involves 15 programs at four CCC locations. These programs have classes that blend classroom and hands-on learning to train students for jobs in the construction, energy, manufacturing and transportation industries.

Welding technology instructor John Willmes talked about how different awards – certificates, diplomas and degrees – prepare students for the workforce. Students Aaron Bundy and Jhonatan Gamboa provided the commentary for a video showing how the college’s welding simulator works.

Auto body technology students Joel Abramson and Jerimiah Kaup did the same thing for a video showing the capabilities of the program’s paint simulator. Instructor Mike Hoskins talked about the benefits of the simulator in terms of reducing waste and supply costs.

Alison Feeney, associate dean of skilled and technical sciences, talked about a Career Fair held on April 12, the 2022 State SkillsUSA competition, and the signing days being held in April at CCC in Columbus, Grand Island, Hastings and Kearney.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Board Room Remodel

The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Mid Plains Construction Company of Grand Island, Nebraska, for $1,119,940.00 to provide the labor and materials for the board room remodel in Grand Island.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the bid from Mid Plains Construction Company for $1,119,940.00 to remodel the CCC board room in Grand Island

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Criminal Justice Simulation Lab/Welding Classroom Remodel

The scope of work consists of two projects – a criminal justice simulation lab and a welding classroom remodel – organized into two separate drawings with a single shared project manual. The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Mid Plains Construction Company of Grand Island, Nebraska, for $861,000.00 to provide the labor and materials for the crime lab and welding classroom on the Grand Island Campus.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the bid from Mid Plains Construction Company for $861,000 to provide the labor and materials for the crime lab and welding classroom on the Grand Island Campus.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Janel Walton, dean of enrollment management, shared the following information:

  • For the 2021, fall semester, 2021 high school graduates from 71 of Nebraska’s 93 counties enrolled at CCC. Twenty-four of the 25 counties in CCC’s service area had 2021 high school graduates who enrolled.
  • Fifty-four percent of 2021 high school graduates inside CCC’s service area were early college students at CCC sometime in their high school career, and 2.6 percent of them completed an award from CCC before their high school graduation. For the 2021 fall semester, 80 percent of CCC’s early college students continued to postsecondary education; 17 percent enrolled at CCC.
  • Since 2016, CCC has tracked the number of students and percentage of early college students enrolling in CCC following graduation and where they come from.
  • Work is underway registering high school students for the 2022 fall semester. The college is in the process of hiring an early college success coach and plans are being made for the annual meeting with high school counselors and administrators as well as onboarding summer sessions for adjunct early college instructors.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • April concludes an active legislative season with several positive results for Nebraska community colleges. Several meetings were held with the NCCA, Nebraska Coordinating Commission and president peers on the next steps.
  • Open forums have been held on all three campuses with a WebEx/distance option and at the area office to give updates, answer questions or get updates from employees.
  • Three CCC students were recognized as members of the Phi Theta Kappa All-Nebraska Academic Team Recognition event in Lincoln.
  • His activities have included the national USDA National Agriculture Day webinar, Heartland United Way Annual Meeting, Grand Island Chamber of Commerce banquet, CCC Foundation executive director press conference, Columbus retiree event, Bellevue University/CCC partnership meeting, Columbus Campus spring play, and Metallica Scholarship guest speaker event.
  • He facilitated the quarterly President’s Quality Action Council meeting with employee and student representatives to discuss strategic initiatives and goals.
  • He signed a new 2+2 business agreement with the University of Nebraska-Kearney and participated in that press conference.
  • He participated in the state SkillsUSA VIP tour and special meeting of the Nebraska Chamber’s Manufacturing Council meeting. More than 35 CCC employees were engaged in this statewide SkillsUSA event through contest planning, judging, coordinating or sponsoring students.
  • He remains involved with the Postsecondary International Network (PIN) as a webinar participant, executive committee member, treasurer, and international conference planning member.
  • The nursing program completed the nursing admission process for the 2022 fall semester. Of the 139 applications received, 111 were qualified. Seventy spots are open, and the nursing program will accept 20 students in Kearney, 40 students in Grand Island and 10 students in Columbus. Currently, 68 students could move into the second year if they pass the current semester.
  • The 2022 dental hygiene graduating class has passed the National Boards with a 100% passing rate. The second year class presented table clinics on April 8 at the Nebraska Dental Hygiene Association annual meeting in LaVista and have provided dental sealants and fluoride varnish programs to Sandy Creek and Lawrence/Nelson schools. The dental assisting faculty and staff also attended the Nebraska Dental Association Annual Session. All dental assisting students have competed requirements to earn state certification in radiography and will complete requirements to earn state certification in coronal polishing.
  • The Nebraska State Fair Landing Zone/Veterans Day Committee has decided to honor the last 20 years of service in Afghanistan and those veterans and fallen warriors. CCC Veterans Director Barry Horner and the VRC staff are developing ideas for a digital Wall of Honor to highlight Nebraskans who have fallen as well as CCC students and graduates who are veterans.
  • The Hastings Campus Academic Success Center has moved to a larger space due to increased engagement with students and tutors.
  • Over 600 high school students participated in ACTIONS Day this past March, earning awards in several academic discipline areas.
  • Currently, there are 417 students collegewide who have registered on the Career and Employment Services job board. In addition, 42 employers and 177 new jobs were added to the board in the month of March alone.
  • Signing days were or are being held in April at the Columbus, Grand Island and Hastings campuses and the Kearney Center. These events are modeled after athletic signing days with students coming to campus to declare their intent to attend CCC in the fall, receive scholarships or business sponsorships, and register for classes. Participants include student recruits from fine arts, early childhood education, skilled and technical sciences and business.
  • Mechatronics instructor Dan Davidchik participated in the Northern Tier Enrichment Day @ Wheeler Central. About 150 students from six area schools rotated through five 35-minute sessions rotations of career awareness.
  • Grand Island welding program faculty John Willmes, Mike Snell and Brandon Piersol hosted the high school welding competition on the Grand Island Campus for the state-wide SkillsUSA Conference and Contest in Grand Island April 7-9.
  • The programs within the Hamilton Building hosted a unique career fair opportunity on April 12 through organizers Andrea Hays from Career and Employment Services and Associate Dean Alison Feeney. Over 35 industry partners attended and had an opportunity to network and share job opportunities with over 85 current CCC students from programs in that building: advanced manufacturing design technology, construction technology, drafting and design technology, and welding technology.
  • Heavy equipment operator students and instructors will represent their program at the Nebraska State Trap Meet at the end of April in Doniphan. This event brings in over 3,000 students from across the state over three days.
  • The construction student townhome will be completed by the end of the semester. The program is hosting an open house for contractors, other programs, college staff, instructors, administrators, and area corporations that have been a part of this project. The open house will take place on Sunday, May 1, from 2-4 p.m. Save the Date!
  • There will be over 27 criminal justice students participating in summer internships.
  • The second tenant has been signed for the Grand Island Entrepreneurship Center. In Hastings, the coworking space group is in the process of applying for three sources of potential funding: the USDA's Rural Innovation Stronger Economy grant which was submitted by April 18, on the City of Hastings work session, and Adams County ARPA Fund proposal meeting in May. The proposal for the space, officially being called the Builder District, has also been finalized. Eight businesses recently completed an entrepreneurship workshop in Columbus with six moving forward on their ideas.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Novotny said there was no need for an executive session and requested a motion to adjourn.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY HEIDEN, SECONDED BY AERNI to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny declared the meeting adjourned at 2:21 p.m.

May 19, 2022

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
May 19, 2022

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held Central Community College-Lexington, 1501 Plum Creek Pkwy., Lexington, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair John Novotny called the May 19, 2022, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with eight board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – absent
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Novotny asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Linda Heiden will review the claims prior to the June 16, 2022, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Novotny asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for May 19, 2022.
  2. Minutes of the April 21, 2022, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from April 1 through April 30, 2022, totaling $3,240,634.88.
  4. Financial report as of April 30, 2022.
  5. Purchases:
    Truck Driving Equipment, Hastings: This vehicle would be an addition to the Truck Driving Program to adjust to its growth and to accommodate Entry Level Driver Training requirements. The College President recommends the search for and purchase of a used semi-tractor that meets the designated specifications and does not exceed $90,000.
    Case Track Skid Steer, Hastings: The Diesel Technology Program wants to purchase a Case Track Skid Steer through the Caterpillar Dealer Excellence Fund. It was a trade-in to a dealership and has contemporary technology and repair capabilities that match the program’s curriculum needs. The dealer inspected the machine and provided a list of repairs and the price under market value to purchase it “as is.”
  6. Personnel:
    Brandon Norquest: The College President recommends Brandon Norquest be offered the position of electrical technology instructor in Hastings, effective August 1, 2022.
    Krista Vazquez-Connelly: The College President recommends Krista Vazquez-Connelly be offered the position of music instructor in Columbus, effective August 1, 2022.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Extended Learning Services Report

Dr. Ron Kluck, dean of extended learning services, gave an overview of the ELS division, which includes adult education, business and industry, community education, early college and emergency medical services. Overall enrollment was 19,012 in 2020-21 and 20,098 as of May 18, 2021-22, an increase of 5.7 percent. FTEs were 781.06 in 2020-21 and 905.83 as of May 18, 2021-22, an increase of 15.97 percent.

Amy Hill, ELS regional director in Lexington, introduced the following speakers:

  • Angela Elfgren, adult education coordinator, said the Lexington adult education program is currently serving students from 17 different countries speaking nine different languages. Of the approximate 300 students enrolled in the program, the majority are in English as a second language (ESL) classes. The center also offers GED and citizenship readiness classes. She highlighted several people, including Dalila Earl, who has taught ESL classes for four years, and Jacklyn Marin and Leila Ali, who are 2022 GED graduates.
  • Lori Scroggin, nursing assistant and medication aide instructor, talked about the importance of EMT classes, especially given the fires that have occurred this spring in the Lexington area. CCC-Lexington also offers nursing assistant, medication aide and CPR classes. She shared the story of Isaac Martinez-Ramos, a Cozad High School senior who completed the early college nursing assistant program. He not only won a gold medal in nursing assisting at the State SkillsUSA competition in April, but he also was the first person to respond to a goalie injured at a soccer match.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Townhouse Purchase Agreement; Execution of Closing Documents

For the sale of the student-built townhouse at 3119 W. Laux Drive in Hastings, the CCC Board of Governors is asked to resolve that:

  • The Purchase Agreement and Addendum for the sale are fair and reasonable and are hereby ratified and approved; and
  • The College President or the Vice President of Administrative Services at Central Community College has full authority to execute any and all documents necessary for the closing of the Purchase Agreement and Addendum.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve the resolution.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Power Purchase Agreement

CCC produces energy that exceeds the needs on the Hastings Campus but does not possess the credits on energy purchased from Hastings Utilities. Because Hastings Utilities desires to maintain the credits with the energy purchased, the College President seeks authorization to sign an amended Power Purchase agreement that solidifies these credits to Central Community College for its use and distribution as further directed by the board.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY KELLER to approve the resolution.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – abstain
Skiles – aye

SEVEN “AYES,” ONE ABSTENSION – MOTION CARRIED

Comprehensive Facilities Plan

Joel King presented Central Community College’s new five-year comprehensive facilities plan.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the five-year comprehensive facilities plan as presented and authorize the College President to provide guidance and direction to accomplish the stated goals.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Program Reviews

Program reviews were presented by Dr. Nate Allen, dean of skilled and technical sciences, for the advanced manufacturing design technology, auto body technology, automotive technology and welding technology programs, and by Sarah Kort, dean of health sciences, for the human services program. Upon board approval, these programs will be submitted to the Nebraska Coordinating Commission on Postsecondary Education.

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve the program reviews for the advanced manufacturing design technology, auto body technology, automotive technology, human services and welding technology programs without monitoring.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

State Goal Attainment Resolution

Dr. Gotschall presented Legislative Resolution 335 of the Nebraska Legislature, which was signed April 13, 2022. It notes high state educational attainment’s strong correlation with higher state gross domestic product and per capita income, greater labor force and civic participation, improved health outcomes, and high quality of life. It also recognizes that at least 70 percent of Nebraska’s jobs will soon require a degree, certificate, diploma or other postsecondary or industry credential, but current educational attainment is about 58 percent for Nebraskans ages 25 to 34, and about 55 percent for Nebraskans ages 25 to 64. The 2020-21 National Student Clearinghouse Research report ranks Nebraska as 10th in the nation for the largest ratio of individuals with some college but no credential. The Nebraska Legislative is encouraging the governing boards of the university, state colleges and community colleges as well as the State Board of Education and Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education to adopt a 70 percent attainment goal.

The College President is requesting that the Central Community College Board of Governors:

  • declares it is the goal of the college area to reach at least seventy percent of 25‐ to 34‐year‐old Nebraskans to have a degree, certificate, diploma, or other postsecondary or industry‐recognized credential with economic value by 2030.
  • recognizes the Legislature’s declaration of certain fields of study including science,
  • technology, engineering, manufacturing, agriculture, healthcare and teaching as having a particular strategic importance for the state’s ongoing prosperity and will join schools, colleges, universities, businesses, community partners and the state to increase credential attainment in those fields.
  • encourages recent Nebraska high school graduates to continue their education in Nebraska postsecondary institutions and commends Nebraska postsecondary institutions for their efforts to enroll students from outside the state as a means of meeting the state’s goal of growing a larger and more highly educated workforce.
  • directs CCC administration to complete reporting requirements established by the Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education for their annual comprehensive statewide plan and report of progress to the Legislature toward this goal.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve the resolution.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • He attended the Community Builders event in Schuyler, which was cosponsored by CCC and featured area businesses, a school tour and chamber/economic development updates.
  • The Cabinet is finalizing budget requests including prioritization of equipment purchases and personnel for the upcoming year.
  • He attended the automotive, auto body and diesel technology signing event in Hastings and the early childhood education, fine arts and mechatronics signing event in Columbus.
  • He attended the American Association of Community College national conference where he participated in the Commission for Small and Rural Colleges; the recognition of CCC-Columbus biology instructor, Dr. Lauren Gillespie, as an AACC Dale Parnell Excellence in Teaching recipient; and several multiple sessions on early college, diversity and equity, workforce training and federal legislative updates.
  • He’s working with the NCCA on final plans for the NCCA Board Strategic Planning meeting at CCC-Kearney in May and the annual meeting at CCC-Grand Island in November.
  • He attended the Manufacturing Nebraska’s Future conference held in conjunction with the Nebraska Chamber of Commerce and the Nebraska Manufacturing Council at CCC-Columbus. The campus also hosted an automation vendor show and provided high school student tours during the event.
  • He attended accreditation peer review training provided by the Higher Learning Commission since he’s been assigned to an accreditation review committee for a member college.
  • He attended the Grand Island Public Schools Apprenticeship Signing Event and followed up with Nebraska Commissioner of Labor John Albin regarding CCC’s federal grant application for expanded apprenticeships in cooperation with Southeast and Northeast community colleges.
  • He celebrated with hundreds of CCC graduates at our three commencement ceremonies!
  • He attended a webinar from the National Student Clearinghouse regarding opportunities for reaching students with some college credits, but no credentials. This data fits well with CCC’s strategic initiative and the state’s priority of getting more adults to have college credentials.
  • He attended a Nebraska Chamber of Commerce webinar on tax considerations and implications for remote workers as well as the Aksarben Stakeholders Annual Meeting where he learned about technology, internships and entrepreneurship priorities of the group and state.
  • Krynn Larsen, CCC’s TRIO director, served as a speaker at the EducationQuest Symposium in Lincoln. She presented to 300 high school teachers, administrators and counselors about the importance of TRIO programs across the state.
  • Memorial Day in Grand Island will be a shared event with the United Veterans Club in Grand Island. On May 27, 380 flags will be placed to celebrate the holiday and then recovered on June 3. The Grand Island Campus SVA will be the primary workforce for both days.
  • Of the 19 veteran student graduates this spring, 10 qualified for SALUTE, an academic honorary for veterans.
  • The Grand Island Campus Disability Services Office served the following number of students this past academic year, from August through April: 112 students with disability services information/support and 48 students with pregnancy-related/Title IX support.
  • Job board stats from the CCC Career and Employment Services shows 427 students registered, with 39 new employers and 263 new jobs added in April.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Novotny requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues at 2:29 p.m. after a short break.

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY COWAN that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny reconvened the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting at 3:05 p.m.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY COWAN to adjourn.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny declared the meeting adjourned at 3:06 p.m.

June 16, 2022

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
June 16, 2022

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair John Novotny called the June 16, 2022, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with nine board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Novotny asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Novotny requested that members of the audience register with Scott Miller if they wanted to address the board during the Public Participation segment.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Diane Keller will review the claims prior to the Aug. 18, 2022, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Novotny asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for June 16, 2022.
  2. Minutes of the May 19, 2022, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from May 1 through May 31, 2022, totaling $3,926,540.39.
  4. Financial report as of May 31, 2022.
  5. Purchases: None
  6. Personnel: None

MOVED BY HEIDEN, SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Student Success and Enrollment Management Report

Dr. Beth Klitz, dean of student success, introduced the Career and Employment Services directors to talk about their division.

Joan McCarthy, who is responsible for the Grand Island Campus and Kearney Center, gave an overview of the services geared for students and alumni. These include individualized career advising, occupational and job market information, experiential learning, employment-readiness services, and connections to local and regional employers and jobs and to student success resources. She also covered services for employers such as no-cost advertising, job and career fairs, program advisory council meetings, and referrals to CCC apprenticeships and programs.

Andrea Hays from the Hastings Campus demonstrated the online job board, which gives students, alumni and employers 24/7 access from any location. She shared the following numbers:

  • 3,324 active jobs were posted this past academic year, and 1,423 new jobs have been posted since January 2022.
  • 572 active employers used the site this past academic year, and 188 new employers have used it since January 2022.
  • More than 5,000 students were preregistered as a bulk upload and were invited to set up their accounts this spring; 430 students used their accounts this year; and 83 students posted resumes on the job board.
  • 1,162 alumni have accounts to utilize the job board services.

Brenda Preister from the Columbus Campus focused on CES’ collaborations. She noted that the 33rd annual Job Fair for Nurses was held at the Grand Island Campus this year, drawing 65 employers and 151 students. She also described the Columbus Campus Career Opportunity Fair, which was offered in association with ESU #7 and Vocational Rehab. More than 120 students with disabilities took the opportunity to connect with employers in the Columbus area, making it the largest student event for Vocational Rehab.

Generations of Impact

Dean Moors, executive director of the CCC Foundation, gave an overview of Generations of Impact, a planned giving campaign. He said that of the people they have talked to about designating a planned gift to the CCC Foundation in their estate, 94 percent have indicated an interest in doing so. The campaign has raised more than $10 million of its $25 million goal.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Scott Miller stated no one had signed in for Public Participation.

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Novotny requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

MOVED BY AERNI, SECONDED BY DAVIS that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues after a five-minute break. (Time: 1:46 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY AERNI to return to the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting. (Time: 2:09 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Snack Bar Remodel

The approximate 3,000-square-foot interior remodel of the snack bar on the Grand Island Campus will include demolition of existing finishes, metal stud framed walls, masonry walls and associated mechanical, plumbing, and electrical devices and equipment. The new construction will include cast in place concrete floor patching, metal stud framing, drywall, terrazzo flooring, wall tile, ceilings, casework, food service equipment and finishes, doors and frames, aluminum storefront, plumbing fixtures, mechanical equipment, LED light fixtures, audio/visual equipment, and associated mechanical and electrical equipment and devices.

The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid of $1,586,000 from Mid Plains Construction Company of Grand Island to provide the labor and materials for the snack bar remodel on the Grand Island Campus.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to accept the low acceptable bid of $1,586,000 from Mid Plains Construction Company in Grand Island to provide the labor and materials for remodeling the Grand Island Campus snack bar.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

College President Permission for July Purchases

Because the CCC Board of Governors won’t meet in July 2022, the board hereby authorizes Dr. Matthew Gotschall to approve any needed action items from June 17 through Aug. 17, 2022. He will provide the board with a summary of all actions taken under this authority at the Aug. 18, 2022, board meeting.

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY DAVIS to authorize actions by the College President to approve any needed action items from June 17 through Aug. 17, 2022.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

General Operational Budget Tentative Approval

Tentative approval is requested for the operational budget of $62,528,989.90. Final approval for this budget will be acted upon on Sept. 8, 2022, following a public hearing.

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY AERNI to give tentative approval for the $62,528,989.90 operational budget.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Approval of College President’s Contract

MOVED BY AERNI, SECONDED BY SKILES to allow the board chair to negotiate with the college president and to sign the presidential contract for the 2022-23, 2023-24 and 2024-25 contract years.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

2023 Board Meeting Dates

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve the 2023 meeting dates for the Board of Governors.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Holiday Policy

MOVED by DAVIS, SECONDED BY COWAN to approve the addition of Juneteenth Day as a recognized holiday at Central Community College.

Aerni – aye
Borden – abstain
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

EIGHT “AYE” VOTES; ONE ABSTENTION – MOTION CARRIED

Hastings Campus Presidency

The board is being asked to approve Dr. Christopher Waddle as president of the Hastings Campus, effective June 24, 2022.

He has worked at CCC since 2003, serving as a history and political science instructor at the Hastings Campus before moving into his current position as vice president of human resources in 2011. He holds an associate of arts degree from Southeast Community College, a bachelor of science degree from Peru State College and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Nebraska.

MOVED BY AERNI, SECONDED BY HEIDEN to offer the position of Hastings Campus President to Dr. Christopher Waddle, effective June 24, 2022.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Klitz presented information on the Success Coach Program, which will begin as a pilot program in the 2022-23 academic year with about 180 randomly selected students. CCC staff and faculty members will serve as the coaches for three or four students each. Their role will be to build rapport with their students and interact with them four to seven times. They also are expected to be aware of the students’ academic performance and collaborate with other staff to help ensure their success and to act as a liaison by introducing students to program faculty and referring them to appropriate departments for support services.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported that he:

  • Participated in two days of strategic planning with representatives from the NCCA including Rita Skiles and Diane Keller. CCC-Kearney was the host location and provide a tour to visiting board members from other Nebraska community colleges. He also attended Diane’s retirement celebration in Aurora.
  • Attended the Governor’s Legislative Summary meeting in Grand Island and thanked him for his support of community colleges this session as well as over the past eight years.
  • Participated as the higher education representative on the Greater Nebraska Workforce Development Board. He has been asked to be part of a panel at the Governor’s Workforce Summit this fall.
  • Met with a area superintendents about tuition options for Early College students taking CCC classes while in high school and taught by high school (CCC qualified) teachers.
  • Attended training organized by CCC but presented by external professionals, one on new budgeting software and the second on enrollment management, emphasizing Gen Z.
  • Led a presentation to representatives of the Suzanne and Walter Scott Foundation regarding a possible partnership program.
  • Participated in the dean of instruction/nursing interviews. No candidate was selected so the position is being readvertised.
  • Invited to participate in a master planning session for the Grand Island Children’s Museum that is proposed for the old armory building.
  • Attended the Grand Island Economic Development annual meeting/luncheon and the Columbus Chamber of Commerce annual meeting where three of the award winners were CCC graduates.
  • Met with ACCT reps regarding the Nebraska Governor’s Institute that the college will host in November as part of the NCCA annual meeting.
  • Participated in learning from CCC’s Leading with Excellence class which presented information and provided recommendations on future LWE experiences.
  • Held multiple meetings regarding future changes as we explore reorganization of extended learning services, training, health sciences, nursing and business divisions in addition to changes in reporting of college communications, sustainability, disability services and human resources.
  • Is participating in a Higher Learning Commission Assurance Review of another HLC college to keep updated on accreditation processes.

He also shared the following reports:

  • Grand Island student and veteran Steve Floyd has volunteered to be the keynote speaker and Grand Marshall of the 2022 Nebraska State Fair. This year’s theme is honoring service during the Global War on Terror, which started shortly after September 11, 2001, and ended last May. There is an entire generation of veterans who have served 20 or more years since 9/11, and Steve is one of them. As a 20-year retiree of the U.S. Navy, he will talk about what motivated him to join and serve, and what he learned what freedom meant to him.
  • The CCC-Grand Island Career and Employment Services Office has registered 23 new employers and 101 jobs have been posted this month. Over 400 CCC students registered to see these updates.
  • Fall housing applications as of this week are 134 (out of 150) in Columbus and 226 (out of 390) in Hastings. More new student orientations are planned yet this summer so both numbers will go up prior to August. The first application has been received for the UNK housing opportunity this fall.
  • All medical lab technician students are successful in their first three weeks of summer clinicals. New for summer clinical courses is weekly group check-in meetings where they can discuss the cool things they are seeing, how they are applying what they have learned, and areas they felt underprepared for. The students give positive feedback about this addition and feel it provides increased support for them.
  • Drs. Amy Mancini and Nate Allen, deans of instruction, attended a conference in Lincoln at the University of Nebraska Innovation campus June 2-4 which was hosted by the National Council of Instructional Administrators. Other national instructional administrators attended and engaged on such topics on diversity, faculty engagement and leadership.
  • Several skilled and technical sciences positions remain open after multiple searches. These include quality, commercial construction, associate dean of STS, and adjuncts in advanced manufacturing and mechatronics.
  • Columbus welding faculty met with Dr. Coleen Stice regarding the possibility of making portable stoves for use in international mission projects. Instructor Bryce Standley led a workshop for employees from CNH in May on robotic welding through the training and development division as well as a workshop for employees from Camaco. Another training is planned for CNH employees in July.
  • Diesel instructor Jeff Bexten has 33 students placed in internships/co-ops across Nebraska this summer.
  • Eilers Machine Shop in Lexington has been added as an apprenticeship partner with CCC. The business anticipates sending students to the AMDT program in Kearney for evening classes beginning this fall.
  • Associate Dean Michelle Setlik is setting up a July meeting that will include Tim Jares and Bree Dority, dean and associate dean in the business division at UNK, and other TBD College of Business leadership with CCC business administration and business occupations leadership to continue exploring ways for both colleges to work together and possibly add another INFO pathway.
  • Lindsay Higel, hospitality management and culinary arts program director, held a cooking class for residents of the Maryland Program. The class will be held monthly until October as part of a program with UNL Extension to teach about food waste; budgeting for food, nutrition and healthier eating/cooking; and basic cooking skills.
  • The Grand Island Entrepreneurship Center has rented out its second office (one remaining) and has scheduled a three-part marketing series in collaboration with the Center for Rural Affairs. The speaker will be Julie Wright, owner of Tally Creative. Dates are July 12, 19, and 26.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY BORDEN, SECONDED BY COWAN to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Novotny declared the meeting adjourned at 2:58 p.m.