2021 Board of Governors Minutes

January 21, 2021

Central Community College
Board of Governors' Meeting Minutes
January 21, 2021

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sam Cowan called the January 21, 2021, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with 11 board members present. Members attending via teleconference from their home or office were Linda Aerni, Sandra Borden, Roger Davis, Linda Heiden, Diane Keller, John Novotny, Tom Pirnie and Rita Skiles.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present

POLICY ITEMS

Cowan announced the slate of officers for 2021. They are as follows:

Sandra Borden, Chair
John A. Novotny, Vice Chair
Rita Skiles, Secretary
Tom Pirnie, Treasurer
Diane Keller, NCCA Representative
Austin Miller, NCCA Representative
Sandra Borden, NCCA Representative Alternate

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY MILLER to accept the slate of officers.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Elizabeth Lay, legal counsel, administered the Oath of Office to newly elected member Michelle Broekemier and reelected members Sandra Borden, Sam Cowan, Linda Heiden, John Novotny and Tom Pirnie as well as to the 2021 officers and NCCA representatives.

College President Dr. Matt Gotschall presented outgoing chair, Sam Cowan, with an appreciation plaque for his service, dedication and leadership to the board.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Sam Cowan will review the claims prior to the February 18, 2021, board meeting in Hastings.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Borden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Heiden reviewed the claims prior to the meeting and stated everything was in order.

  1. Agenda for January 21, 2021.
  2. Minutes of the November 19, 2020, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Nov. 1 through Nov. 30, 2020, totaling $4,582,875.60 and from Dec. 1 through Dec. 31, 2020, totaling $5,860,410.87.
  4. Financial reports as of Nov. 30, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020.
  5. Purchases:
    Gausman Building boiler replacement, Hastings Campus: The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Johnson Controls for $224,550.00 to provide all labor and material to replace the Gausman boiler on the Hastings Campus.
  6. Personnel:
    Sarah Kort: The College President recommends that Sarah Kort be offered the position of Dean of Instruction for Health Sciences in Grand Island, effective February 1, 2021.
  7. Motion to Accept the Nebraska Career Scholarships: As allowed by the Nebraska Legislature and the Nebraska Department of Economic Development, Central Community College is legally eligible to apply for the new Nebraska Career Scholarship Program. Therefore, the Board of Governors of the Central Community College authorizes the president to file the application for the Nebraska Career Scholarships including all understanding and assurances contained in the documentation of the Nebraska Career Scholarship Requirements and Conditions.
  8. Board Meetings Video Recordings: The College President recommends approval of the following retention policy for the video recordings of the board's available scheduled meetings:
    • The Board Meetings Video Recordings Retention Policy states: “The College is not required to video all scheduled meetings, but as much as possible does so as a public service, communication, and transparency function. When recordings are made, the College shall maintain video recordings of the board meetings for the duration of 60 months. After that point the College may destroy the copies in the manner appropriate to the current technology.”
    • The Board of Governors accepts the concept of having board meetings videoed for viewing by constituents; recognizes that retention of the video recording is not specifically addressed within Schedule 155 and is attempting to remedy this with specific direction; and further recognizes that video recordings best fits the definition of the category labeled “Board sub‐team minutes and board support material” within schedule 155.
    • Therefore; it is the intent of the CCC Board of Governors to place into a policy the same standard as is reflected in Schedule 155 for clarity of the matter.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY PIRNIE “to approve the claims with the exception of payments to myself and also to approve the other consent items.”

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Academic Education Report

Dr. Beverly Clark gave the Academic Education report, which focused on the challenges that instructors faced while teaching through the pandemic as well as the successes they had. He said they had to rethink the way they were serving students, including how they were communicating, sharing information and providing access to resources. He shared videos of the following instructors who spoke about their experiences:

  • Katie Hodges, English instructor at the Grand Island Campus. She said the biggest challenge has been the technology and communication with students. Students are assumed to know technology because they’ve used laptops and iPads since kindergarten, but this isn’t the case. They may know a lot about Facebook, Instagram and Twitter but not so much about Word or Google Docs. Part of her answer was to expand the options students had for communicating with her from email only to include phone calls, texts and a WebEx link.
  • Columbus Campus vocal music instructor Jeff Kitson, theater instructor Stephanie Tschetter and instrumental music instructor Anthony Burnham spoke about the special challenges of teaching performing arts while staying safe. Students learned to sing, act and play instruments while wearing face masks and maintaining distance from their fellow performers. The community members in the band have commented that they think it’s great CCC still has students coming onto the campus.
  • Tanner Jenkins, biological sciences instructor at the Hastings Campus, shared how he used Labster to allow his students to interact in a virtual setting while they learned how to obtain, handle and identify samples. Because they missed hands-on experience, he also had them grow and nurture a sourdough starter at home. They wrote a paper on what they observed and then were challenged to cooks something with their starter such as pizza or bread. Students enjoyed the experience and some of them said they planned to keep their starter and use it again.

Dr. Clark also introduced Kimberly Milovac, who was hired for the new position of area early childhood education coordinator. In addition to connecting with people inside and outside the college, she has been streamlining the background check that early childhood education students must pass. The cost of the background checks, ranging from $50 to $100, can also be a barrier to students, one that has now been addressed through funding arranged by the CCC Foundation.

Capital Budget Report

Craig Boroff gave an overview of the 2021-22 capital budget, which will come to the board for tentative approval at the February meeting. The budget includes new projects and maintenance, repair and replacement projects.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

There were no items to be brought to the board.

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Becky Cook, institutional research coordinator, reported on the CARES Act and the Nebraska Workforce Retraining Initiative (NWRI).

The CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act was signed into law on March 27, 2020. CCC sent three surveys to all students registered for credit-bearing courses and received 1,304 responses for the spring term, 557 responses for the summer term and 696 responses for the fall term.

Students were asked questions such as:

  • I have lost my job or had work hours/wages reduced due to COVID-related issues.
  • I am unable to pay for basic needs such as rent, utilities, groceries, etc., due to COVID-related issues.
  • I have had to spend additional costs due to childcare coverage issues.
  • I have had to spend additional funds on course materials to replicate course assignments at home versus on campus.

Each application was assessed by a team of CCC employees. A total of $1,201,900 was awarded to 1,263 students: $717,500 in the spring term, $151,250 in the summer term, and $333,150 in the fall term. Students who received funds were ineligible to receive them again but could receive up to $1,000 total across multiple terms.

The NWRI was administered by the Nebraska Department of Economic Development in partnership with the Nebraska Department of Labor. The initiative was funded by $16 million from the state’s $1.08 billion federal Coronavirus Relief Fund allocation.

One survey was launched so that anyone in the community could apply. The college received 604 applications. Each applicant was contacted by a team of CCC employees and assessed for eligibility. Most of the applicant questions related to their eligibility based on the state’s standards: Were they furloughed or laid off, unemployed because their job was eliminated or working reduced hours? They were asked to select from a list of training/programs that met NWRI qualifications.

Students were eligible to receive up to $1,100. To date, $151,437.48 has been awarded to 169 students in the form of:

  • Tuition – $141,260
    $99,635 in the 2020 fall semester
    $41,625 in the 2021 spring semester
  • Books – $10,177.48 in the 2020 fall semester. The 2021 spring data is still being entered.

Other costs included - $337,613.73 with $201,936.53 going to administration fees and $135,677.20 for equipment fees.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

  • Over 280 graduate candidates received diplomas and/or associate degrees in December. They were recognized in media releases and those who had RSVPed to attend the canceled in-person receptions received a gift box in the mail with alumni memorabilia.
  • We sent a list of 367 employees (out of 597 considered essential: – all full-time and regular part-time plus elected board of governors) who expressed they were ready for COVID-19 vaccines to the health departments and the Nebraska National Guard, which is coordinating distribution. CCC’s total employment runs around 1, 440 each month. The breakdown of those ready for vaccines is 107 in Columbus, 133 in Grand Island; 92 in Hastings; 10 in Holdrege, Lexington and Ord combined; and 25 in Kearney. We’re likely looking at another month, or even early March, before getting a green light from the health departments. Note the numbers above do not include several employees and board members who reported they are already on a list or have already been vaccinated due to fitting priority A categories such as health care and first responders.
  • Shawn Patsios, the new Veterans Resource Center coordinator for Kearney and Grand Island, held his promotion ceremony at CCC-Kearney on January 15. He was promoted from technical sergeant to E7 master sergeant in the Nebraska Air National Guard and then headed to Washington, D.C., to participate in President-Elect Biden’s inauguration.
  • CCC will receive $4,636,930 as part of the latest federal stimulus bill from the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA) for Higher Education Emergency Relief Funding. At least $945,227 of that amount will be spent for student grants with the remainder used for other expenses or lost revenue related to COVID. Also passed at that time were significant changes in the FAFSA, the federal needs-based scholarship program, that will be implemented starting in 2023-24. Many more students should qualify due to the simplification of the application form.
  • Spring 2021 enrollments are nearly even to last spring 2020, which is encouraging given fall enrollments were down about 5%. Classes started on January 11.
  • Ninety-nine employees were recognized in a CCC-first ever areawide service award video that celebrated a collective 1,325 years of service to our students and communities. The video included two 45-year employees, Laura Emde and Deb Payne.
  • Several program advisory boards were held November through January to review curriculum, budget needs, enrollment and current trends in the industry. Involved programs included automotive technology, quality, diesel technology, and drafting and design technology.
  • Entrepreneurship business coaching continues to expand in the Columbus and Hastings areas with growing interest in Grand Island and Kearney. 
  • Areawide student activities personnel will host week-long events as part of Holocaust Remembrance Day and include a national speaker, Holocaust survivor and genocide scholar, Peter Stein, who will speak virtually at 6:30 p.m. on January 27.
  • Coordinated outreach efforts have yielded positive results for the Veteran Military Resource Centers with an over 98% return rate of fall 2020 veteran students enrolled in spring 2021 classes and overall enrollment growth of 43 veterans in summer 2020, 88 in fall 2020 and 124 in spring 2021. Congratulations to new director, Barry Horner, and his staff.
  • Ashley Weets at the Kearney Center has joined the directorate board for the American College Personnel Association Commission on 2-year Colleges.
  • CCC and UNK have received an Equity Transfer Initiative grant from the American Association of Community Colleges, American Association of State College and Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities to develop up to seven pathways for completion of associate to bachelor programs. Work will begin immediately on these pathways, which will include targeting completion rates of minority students. The goal is to recruit 100 students by this fall and 350 by next year.
  • A transfer agreement has been signed with Hastings College. The agreement allows Hastings College students to take up to six credits from CCC each semester and then transfer those credits back to Hastings College.
  • A memorandum of understanding has been signed with the University of Nebraska Medical Center that establishes joint acceptance. Students accepted into CCC programs will be accepted into UNMC’s bachelor’s degree programs.
  • The next board meeting will be held Feb. 18 at the Hastings Campus. The CCC Foundation board will meet in the morning, and a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the welding lab will be held at 11:30 a.m. A board work session will be held at about 12:15 p.m. during lunch.
  • Electrical charging stations are being added at CCC’s three campuses and the Kearney Center as part of a statewide grant from the Nebraska Environmental Trust. The stations will provide charging for CCC’s motor pool vehicles as well as for the public. Other entities involved in the grant include Metropolitan Community College, the University of Nebraska and many cities and towns. The State of Nebraska is collecting data from the stations.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Borden requested an executive session to discuss personnel.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY HEIDEN that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues. (Time: 241 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

MOVED BY COWAN, SECONDED BY SKILES to return to the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting. (Time: 3:36 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye 

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye 

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Borden declared the meeting adjourned at 3:37 p.m.

February 18, 2021

Central Community College
Board of Governors' Meeting Minutes
February 18, 2021

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors’ meeting was given in advance to CCC board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is located in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Hall Student Union, Cottonwood Room, at Central Community College, 550 S. Technical Blvd., Hastings, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sandra Borden called the Feb. 18, 2021, meeting to order at 1 p.m. with 10 board members present. Borden asked for the roll call. Members attending via teleconference from their home or office were Linda Heiden, Austin Miller and John Novotny.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – absent
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present

POLICY ITEMS

Elizabeth Lay, legal counsel, administered the Oath of Office to newly elected board member Michelle Broekemier and reelected board members Sandra Borden, Sam Cowan and Tom Pirnie.

Public Participation

Borden requested that members of the audience register with Scott Miller if they wanted to address the board during the Public Participation segment.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Roger Davis will review the claims prior to the March 18, 2021, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Borden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for Feb. 18, 2021, board meeting.
  2. Minutes of the Jan. 21, 2021, board meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Jan. 1 through Jan. 31, 2021, totaling $7,879,694.26.
  4. Financial reports as of Jan. 31, 2021.
  5. Purchases: None.
  6. Personnel: None.
  7. Kim Hurt’s Sabbatical Report.

Sam Cowan reviewed the claims prior to the meeting and stated everything was in order.

MOVED BY COWAN, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARTNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Foundation Report

Dean Moors shared the following information:

  • The consolidated assets of the CCC Foundation and the Warren and Velda Wilson Foundation stood at $44 million as of January 31, 2021.
  • The Kathleen E. Tebbe Scholarship has been established as a new college-wide fund. It will provide scholarships for students in the academic transfer, early childhood education and the human services programs who have completed at least one semester at CCC with a 2.5 or greater GPA. The scholarship may be used for tuition and books.
  • The Pacesetter employee appeal drew a participation rate of 66% The 2020 yearend appeal brought in a total of $276,150 from 122 employee donors.
  • The foundation now has nearly 25,000 graduates in its database. During 2020-21, 166 graduates donated $36,461 to the foundation.

Hastings Campus Report

Dr. Jerry Wallace shared the Hastings Campus annual report created by media arts students and explained the process they used to complete it.  He then introduced the following people:

  • Dr. Nate Allen, dean of skilled and technical sciences, who talked about the newest college pathway in automotive technology for Holdrege High School. It faced the same issue as the on-campus program of needing to teach in a different manner because of COVID. The way this issue was addressed was described by automotive technology instructors Kyle Finecy, Nick Kelley and John Oberheide. They assigned online exercises, split classes in half so students could work in the lab for an extended period, alternated on a weekly basis between online theory assignments and work in the lab, and used WebEx and VidGrid to record processes for students to watch.
  • Mark Funkey, associate dean of skilled and technical sciences, discussed the construction technology program’s long association with Habitat for Humanity. Last year, the program built two houses for the organization, one on campus and the other offsite. This year, construction students are working on an offsite townhouse project. Also addressing the board were construction technology instructor Keith Dubas, who talked about how the program adapted to meet the challenges posed by COVID; students Dillon Kohl of Central City and Logan Nordby of Hastings who talked about some of the difficulties of learning construction during a pandemic and expressed their appreciation for the college doing everything it could to stay open; and Laurel Bain, who made the transition from being a CCC student to a CCC instructor during 2020. She said working as a CCC instructor on the townhouse project has been an incredible learning experience for both her and her students.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Scott Miller stated no one had signed in for Public Participation.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

2020-25 CCC Mission, Vision and Values

Dr. Matt Gotschall presented the proposed Central Community College mission, vision and values for 2020-25. A recent survey showed employee support for these different categories ranging from 96% to 100%.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve CCC’s mission, vision, values, outcomes and strategic initiatives for 2020-25.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Grand Island Public Schools Proposal

Dr. Marcie Kemnitz presented a motion to engage in a cooperative agreement between CHI Health‐St. Francis, Grand Island Public Schools and Central Community College for expansion of the Academy in Medical Sciences. The expansion will provide unique shared space at the hospital for high school and dual credit courses for GIPS students. Instruction and curriculum for these dual credit classes are provided by CCC. The initiative is budgeted at over $7.2 million dollars, which will come from both public and private sources.

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY COWAN to authorize an agreement to contribute up to $250,000 in specific equipment and furnishings to be used for CCC instruction and mutually agreed upon personnel costs to implement the Grand Island Public School’s Academy of Medical Sciences in cooperation with CHI Health St. Francis Hospital.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Grand Island Entrepreneurship Center

Dr. Kemnitz presented information on a proposed Entrepreneurship Center in Grand Island, which will be located in a currently unfinished space in downtown Grand Island. Before CCC can take occupancy, the space will be remodeled similar to the plans presented to the board during the work session.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to authorize the College President to negotiate an agreement to lease space for the Entrepreneurship Center in Grand Island.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Capital Improvement Budget

Joel King gave an overview of the projects included in the capital improvement budget. The College President asked for tentative approval of the 2021-22 capital improvement budget so these projects can be started. Official approval of the budget is set for September.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY COWAN to accept the capital improvement budget.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Tuition, Fees, Board and Room Rates for 2021-22

Joel King reported that there will be no increase in the tuition, fees or rooms for 2021-22. Board will be raised by 3.1% as per the CCC’s contract with Chartwells. Tuition and fees for Early College students will remain the same as last year.

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the tuition, fees, room and board rates for 2021-22.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Candace Walton gave a report on the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data (IPEDs). She provided information on CCC’s comparison group; enrollment measures; number of academic awards; tuition and required fees; and retention, graduation and transfer-out rates for first-time, full-time award-seeking students.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

  • Congratulations to the Foundation and CCC employees on the AMDT/welding donor tours on February 17 and the ribbon cutting on February 18.
  • COVID-related cases continue to be on the decline for both employees and students since the beginning of the semester and are greatly reduced since a high last November 2020.
  • Dr. Gotschall participated in the NCCA quarterly board meeting where they took positions on the Nebraska legislative bills that have been introduced. He provided written support for the Appropriations Committee regarding community college funding and attended the hearing on February 16, emailed and called area senators and Sen. Flood from the Revenue Committee regarding clarifications on CCC’s tax levy history and valuations, and attended the Nebraska Economic Development legislative priorities meeting.
  • He participated in the ACCT legislative conference sessions, which included multiple updates on the national legislative priorities of the new Biden Administration and Congress.
  • Last month, Central Community College received $4,636,930 as part of the latest federal stimulus bill from the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, (CRRSAA) 2020 for the Higher Education Emergency Relief Funding. At least $945,227 of that amount must be spent on student grants; the remaining amount may be used for other COVID-related expenses or lost revenue due to COVID-19. The financial aid office disbursed over $745,000 in direct aid to students this week (all low-income, Pell-eligible current students in good standing). Applications from a second or third tier of students will be reviewed with funds to go out once we get final guidelines from USDOE. Proposed changes by the Biden Administration to rules provided by the Trump Administration are causing some delays on confirmations. CCC administrators can submit proposals until March 1 regarding uses for the stimulus funds, which so far include additional remote instructional and proctoring software; employee compensation for adjuncts, extra days worked and faculty overload; lost revenue for adult education, community education and training and development; and informational technology switches, firewalls, security, IP classroom upgrades an employee training.
  • Dr. Gotschall participated in the Greater Nebraska Workforce Investment Board meetings on January 27-28 and continues to serve as the representative for educational providers seeking to assist dislocated workers, youth programming and services offered through the Nebraska Dept of Labor’s Workforce Development Centers.
  • The Nebraska Math Readiness initiative continues to grow with additional area schools and partners. The initiative addresses the math learning gaps of predominately high school seniors to make them less dependent on remedial math needs once they’ve graduated.
  • The Postsecondary International Network executive committee continues to plan for virtual webinars that will be held in conjunction with the World Federation Conference members. Major topics will include addressing leadership and best practices regarding COVID-19 responses, international education, student support and technology infrastructure.
  • Dr. Gotschall is continuing his involvement in Heartland United Way as president-elect. The organization supports Hall, Hamilton, Howard and Merrick counties and provides campaign updates, community investment, executive and finance committee meetings in addition to assisting with a monthly food distribution.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Borden requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY COWAN that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues. (Time: 2:35 p.m.)

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

John Novotny was unable to attend the executive session.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to return to the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting. (Time: 3:20 p.m.)

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY DAVIS to adjourn.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Borden declared the meeting adjourned at 3:21 p.m.