2021 Board of Governors Minutes

January 21, 2021

Central Community College
Board of Governors' Meeting Minutes
January 21, 2021

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sam Cowan called the January 21, 2021, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with 11 board members present. Members attending via teleconference from their home or office were Linda Aerni, Sandra Borden, Roger Davis, Linda Heiden, Diane Keller, John Novotny, Tom Pirnie and Rita Skiles.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present

POLICY ITEMS

Cowan announced the slate of officers for 2021. They are as follows:

Sandra Borden, Chair
John A. Novotny, Vice Chair
Rita Skiles, Secretary
Tom Pirnie, Treasurer
Diane Keller, NCCA Representative
Austin Miller, NCCA Representative
Sandra Borden, NCCA Representative Alternate

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY MILLER to accept the slate of officers.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Elizabeth Lay, legal counsel, administered the Oath of Office to newly elected member Michelle Broekemier and reelected members Sandra Borden, Sam Cowan, Linda Heiden, John Novotny and Tom Pirnie as well as to the 2021 officers and NCCA representatives.

College President Dr. Matt Gotschall presented outgoing chair, Sam Cowan, with an appreciation plaque for his service, dedication and leadership to the board.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Sam Cowan will review the claims prior to the February 18, 2021, board meeting in Hastings.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Borden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Heiden reviewed the claims prior to the meeting and stated everything was in order.

  1. Agenda for January 21, 2021.
  2. Minutes of the November 19, 2020, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Nov. 1 through Nov. 30, 2020, totaling $4,582,875.60 and from Dec. 1 through Dec. 31, 2020, totaling $5,860,410.87.
  4. Financial reports as of Nov. 30, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020.
  5. Purchases:
    Gausman Building boiler replacement, Hastings Campus: The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Johnson Controls for $224,550.00 to provide all labor and material to replace the Gausman boiler on the Hastings Campus.
  6. Personnel:
    Sarah Kort: The College President recommends that Sarah Kort be offered the position of Dean of Instruction for Health Sciences in Grand Island, effective February 1, 2021.
  7. Motion to Accept the Nebraska Career Scholarships: As allowed by the Nebraska Legislature and the Nebraska Department of Economic Development, Central Community College is legally eligible to apply for the new Nebraska Career Scholarship Program. Therefore, the Board of Governors of the Central Community College authorizes the president to file the application for the Nebraska Career Scholarships including all understanding and assurances contained in the documentation of the Nebraska Career Scholarship Requirements and Conditions.
  8. Board Meetings Video Recordings: The College President recommends approval of the following retention policy for the video recordings of the board's available scheduled meetings:
    • The Board Meetings Video Recordings Retention Policy states: “The College is not required to video all scheduled meetings, but as much as possible does so as a public service, communication, and transparency function. When recordings are made, the College shall maintain video recordings of the board meetings for the duration of 60 months. After that point the College may destroy the copies in the manner appropriate to the current technology.”
    • The Board of Governors accepts the concept of having board meetings videoed for viewing by constituents; recognizes that retention of the video recording is not specifically addressed within Schedule 155 and is attempting to remedy this with specific direction; and further recognizes that video recordings best fits the definition of the category labeled “Board sub‐team minutes and board support material” within schedule 155.
    • Therefore; it is the intent of the CCC Board of Governors to place into a policy the same standard as is reflected in Schedule 155 for clarity of the matter.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY PIRNIE “to approve the claims with the exception of payments to myself and also to approve the other consent items.”

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Academic Education Report

Dr. Beverly Clark gave the Academic Education report, which focused on the challenges that instructors faced while teaching through the pandemic as well as the successes they had. He said they had to rethink the way they were serving students, including how they were communicating, sharing information and providing access to resources. He shared videos of the following instructors who spoke about their experiences:

  • Katie Hodges, English instructor at the Grand Island Campus. She said the biggest challenge has been the technology and communication with students. Students are assumed to know technology because they’ve used laptops and iPads since kindergarten, but this isn’t the case. They may know a lot about Facebook, Instagram and Twitter but not so much about Word or Google Docs. Part of her answer was to expand the options students had for communicating with her from email only to include phone calls, texts and a WebEx link.
  • Columbus Campus vocal music instructor Jeff Kitson, theater instructor Stephanie Tschetter and instrumental music instructor Anthony Burnham spoke about the special challenges of teaching performing arts while staying safe. Students learned to sing, act and play instruments while wearing face masks and maintaining distance from their fellow performers. The community members in the band have commented that they think it’s great CCC still has students coming onto the campus.
  • Tanner Jenkins, biological sciences instructor at the Hastings Campus, shared how he used Labster to allow his students to interact in a virtual setting while they learned how to obtain, handle and identify samples. Because they missed hands-on experience, he also had them grow and nurture a sourdough starter at home. They wrote a paper on what they observed and then were challenged to cooks something with their starter such as pizza or bread. Students enjoyed the experience and some of them said they planned to keep their starter and use it again.

Dr. Clark also introduced Kimberly Milovac, who was hired for the new position of area early childhood education coordinator. In addition to connecting with people inside and outside the college, she has been streamlining the background check that early childhood education students must pass. The cost of the background checks, ranging from $50 to $100, can also be a barrier to students, one that has now been addressed through funding arranged by the CCC Foundation.

Capital Budget Report

Craig Boroff gave an overview of the 2021-22 capital budget, which will come to the board for tentative approval at the February meeting. The budget includes new projects and maintenance, repair and replacement projects.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

There were no items to be brought to the board.

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Becky Cook, institutional research coordinator, reported on the CARES Act and the Nebraska Workforce Retraining Initiative (NWRI).

The CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act was signed into law on March 27, 2020. CCC sent three surveys to all students registered for credit-bearing courses and received 1,304 responses for the spring term, 557 responses for the summer term and 696 responses for the fall term.

Students were asked questions such as:

  • I have lost my job or had work hours/wages reduced due to COVID-related issues.
  • I am unable to pay for basic needs such as rent, utilities, groceries, etc., due to COVID-related issues.
  • I have had to spend additional costs due to childcare coverage issues.
  • I have had to spend additional funds on course materials to replicate course assignments at home versus on campus.

Each application was assessed by a team of CCC employees. A total of $1,201,900 was awarded to 1,263 students: $717,500 in the spring term, $151,250 in the summer term, and $333,150 in the fall term. Students who received funds were ineligible to receive them again but could receive up to $1,000 total across multiple terms.

The NWRI was administered by the Nebraska Department of Economic Development in partnership with the Nebraska Department of Labor. The initiative was funded by $16 million from the state’s $1.08 billion federal Coronavirus Relief Fund allocation.

One survey was launched so that anyone in the community could apply. The college received 604 applications. Each applicant was contacted by a team of CCC employees and assessed for eligibility. Most of the applicant questions related to their eligibility based on the state’s standards: Were they furloughed or laid off, unemployed because their job was eliminated or working reduced hours? They were asked to select from a list of training/programs that met NWRI qualifications.

Students were eligible to receive up to $1,100. To date, $151,437.48 has been awarded to 169 students in the form of:

  • Tuition – $141,260
    $99,635 in the 2020 fall semester
    $41,625 in the 2021 spring semester
  • Books – $10,177.48 in the 2020 fall semester. The 2021 spring data is still being entered.

Other costs included - $337,613.73 with $201,936.53 going to administration fees and $135,677.20 for equipment fees.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

  • Over 280 graduate candidates received diplomas and/or associate degrees in December. They were recognized in media releases and those who had RSVPed to attend the canceled in-person receptions received a gift box in the mail with alumni memorabilia.
  • We sent a list of 367 employees (out of 597 considered essential: – all full-time and regular part-time plus elected board of governors) who expressed they were ready for COVID-19 vaccines to the health departments and the Nebraska National Guard, which is coordinating distribution. CCC’s total employment runs around 1, 440 each month. The breakdown of those ready for vaccines is 107 in Columbus, 133 in Grand Island; 92 in Hastings; 10 in Holdrege, Lexington and Ord combined; and 25 in Kearney. We’re likely looking at another month, or even early March, before getting a green light from the health departments. Note the numbers above do not include several employees and board members who reported they are already on a list or have already been vaccinated due to fitting priority A categories such as health care and first responders.
  • Shawn Patsios, the new Veterans Resource Center coordinator for Kearney and Grand Island, held his promotion ceremony at CCC-Kearney on January 15. He was promoted from technical sergeant to E7 master sergeant in the Nebraska Air National Guard and then headed to Washington, D.C., to participate in President-Elect Biden’s inauguration.
  • CCC will receive $4,636,930 as part of the latest federal stimulus bill from the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA) for Higher Education Emergency Relief Funding. At least $945,227 of that amount will be spent for student grants with the remainder used for other expenses or lost revenue related to COVID. Also passed at that time were significant changes in the FAFSA, the federal needs-based scholarship program, that will be implemented starting in 2023-24. Many more students should qualify due to the simplification of the application form.
  • Spring 2021 enrollments are nearly even to last spring 2020, which is encouraging given fall enrollments were down about 5%. Classes started on January 11.
  • Ninety-nine employees were recognized in a CCC-first ever areawide service award video that celebrated a collective 1,325 years of service to our students and communities. The video included two 45-year employees, Laura Emde and Deb Payne.
  • Several program advisory boards were held November through January to review curriculum, budget needs, enrollment and current trends in the industry. Involved programs included automotive technology, quality, diesel technology, and drafting and design technology.
  • Entrepreneurship business coaching continues to expand in the Columbus and Hastings areas with growing interest in Grand Island and Kearney. 
  • Areawide student activities personnel will host week-long events as part of Holocaust Remembrance Day and include a national speaker, Holocaust survivor and genocide scholar, Peter Stein, who will speak virtually at 6:30 p.m. on January 27.
  • Coordinated outreach efforts have yielded positive results for the Veteran Military Resource Centers with an over 98% return rate of fall 2020 veteran students enrolled in spring 2021 classes and overall enrollment growth of 43 veterans in summer 2020, 88 in fall 2020 and 124 in spring 2021. Congratulations to new director, Barry Horner, and his staff.
  • Ashley Weets at the Kearney Center has joined the directorate board for the American College Personnel Association Commission on 2-year Colleges.
  • CCC and UNK have received an Equity Transfer Initiative grant from the American Association of Community Colleges, American Association of State College and Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities to develop up to seven pathways for completion of associate to bachelor programs. Work will begin immediately on these pathways, which will include targeting completion rates of minority students. The goal is to recruit 100 students by this fall and 350 by next year.
  • A transfer agreement has been signed with Hastings College. The agreement allows Hastings College students to take up to six credits from CCC each semester and then transfer those credits back to Hastings College.
  • A memorandum of understanding has been signed with the University of Nebraska Medical Center that establishes joint acceptance. Students accepted into CCC programs will be accepted into UNMC’s bachelor’s degree programs.
  • The next board meeting will be held Feb. 18 at the Hastings Campus. The CCC Foundation board will meet in the morning, and a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the welding lab will be held at 11:30 a.m. A board work session will be held at about 12:15 p.m. during lunch.
  • Electrical charging stations are being added at CCC’s three campuses and the Kearney Center as part of a statewide grant from the Nebraska Environmental Trust. The stations will provide charging for CCC’s motor pool vehicles as well as for the public. Other entities involved in the grant include Metropolitan Community College, the University of Nebraska and many cities and towns. The State of Nebraska is collecting data from the stations.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Borden requested an executive session to discuss personnel.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY HEIDEN that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues. (Time: 241 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

MOVED BY COWAN, SECONDED BY SKILES to return to the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting. (Time: 3:36 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye 

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye 

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Borden declared the meeting adjourned at 3:37 p.m.

February 18, 2021

Central Community College
Board of Governors' Meeting Minutes
February 18, 2021

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors’ meeting was given in advance to CCC board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is located in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Hall Student Union, Cottonwood Room, at Central Community College, 550 S. Technical Blvd., Hastings, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sandra Borden called the Feb. 18, 2021, meeting to order at 1 p.m. with 10 board members present. Borden asked for the roll call. Members attending via teleconference from their home or office were Linda Heiden, Austin Miller and John Novotny.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – absent
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present

POLICY ITEMS

Elizabeth Lay, legal counsel, administered the Oath of Office to newly elected board member Michelle Broekemier and reelected board members Sandra Borden, Sam Cowan and Tom Pirnie.

Public Participation

Borden requested that members of the audience register with Scott Miller if they wanted to address the board during the Public Participation segment.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Roger Davis will review the claims prior to the March 18, 2021, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Borden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for Feb. 18, 2021, board meeting.
  2. Minutes of the Jan. 21, 2021, board meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Jan. 1 through Jan. 31, 2021, totaling $7,879,694.26.
  4. Financial reports as of Jan. 31, 2021.
  5. Purchases: None.
  6. Personnel: None.
  7. Kim Hurt’s Sabbatical Report.

Sam Cowan reviewed the claims prior to the meeting and stated everything was in order.

MOVED BY COWAN, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARTNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Foundation Report

Dean Moors shared the following information:

  • The consolidated assets of the CCC Foundation and the Warren and Velda Wilson Foundation stood at $44 million as of January 31, 2021.
  • The Kathleen E. Tebbe Scholarship has been established as a new college-wide fund. It will provide scholarships for students in the academic transfer, early childhood education and the human services programs who have completed at least one semester at CCC with a 2.5 or greater GPA. The scholarship may be used for tuition and books.
  • The Pacesetter employee appeal drew a participation rate of 66% The 2020 yearend appeal brought in a total of $276,150 from 122 employee donors.
  • The foundation now has nearly 25,000 graduates in its database. During 2020-21, 166 graduates donated $36,461 to the foundation.

Hastings Campus Report

Dr. Jerry Wallace shared the Hastings Campus annual report created by media arts students and explained the process they used to complete it.  He then introduced the following people:

  • Dr. Nate Allen, dean of skilled and technical sciences, who talked about the newest college pathway in automotive technology for Holdrege High School. It faced the same issue as the on-campus program of needing to teach in a different manner because of COVID. The way this issue was addressed was described by automotive technology instructors Kyle Finecy, Nick Kelley and John Oberheide. They assigned online exercises, split classes in half so students could work in the lab for an extended period, alternated on a weekly basis between online theory assignments and work in the lab, and used WebEx and VidGrid to record processes for students to watch.
  • Mark Funkey, associate dean of skilled and technical sciences, discussed the construction technology program’s long association with Habitat for Humanity. Last year, the program built two houses for the organization, one on campus and the other offsite. This year, construction students are working on an offsite townhouse project. Also addressing the board were construction technology instructor Keith Dubas, who talked about how the program adapted to meet the challenges posed by COVID; students Dillon Kohl of Central City and Logan Nordby of Hastings who talked about some of the difficulties of learning construction during a pandemic and expressed their appreciation for the college doing everything it could to stay open; and Laurel Bain, who made the transition from being a CCC student to a CCC instructor during 2020. She said working as a CCC instructor on the townhouse project has been an incredible learning experience for both her and her students.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Scott Miller stated no one had signed in for Public Participation.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

2020-25 CCC Mission, Vision and Values

Dr. Matt Gotschall presented the proposed Central Community College mission, vision and values for 2020-25. A recent survey showed employee support for these different categories ranging from 96% to 100%.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve CCC’s mission, vision, values, outcomes and strategic initiatives for 2020-25.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Grand Island Public Schools Proposal

Dr. Marcie Kemnitz presented a motion to engage in a cooperative agreement between CHI Health‐St. Francis, Grand Island Public Schools and Central Community College for expansion of the Academy in Medical Sciences. The expansion will provide unique shared space at the hospital for high school and dual credit courses for GIPS students. Instruction and curriculum for these dual credit classes are provided by CCC. The initiative is budgeted at over $7.2 million dollars, which will come from both public and private sources.

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY COWAN to authorize an agreement to contribute up to $250,000 in specific equipment and furnishings to be used for CCC instruction and mutually agreed upon personnel costs to implement the Grand Island Public School’s Academy of Medical Sciences in cooperation with CHI Health St. Francis Hospital.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Grand Island Entrepreneurship Center

Dr. Kemnitz presented information on a proposed Entrepreneurship Center in Grand Island, which will be located in a currently unfinished space in downtown Grand Island. Before CCC can take occupancy, the space will be remodeled similar to the plans presented to the board during the work session.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to authorize the College President to negotiate an agreement to lease space for the Entrepreneurship Center in Grand Island.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Capital Improvement Budget

Joel King gave an overview of the projects included in the capital improvement budget. The College President asked for tentative approval of the 2021-22 capital improvement budget so these projects can be started. Official approval of the budget is set for September.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY COWAN to accept the capital improvement budget.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Tuition, Fees, Board and Room Rates for 2021-22

Joel King reported that there will be no increase in the tuition, fees or rooms for 2021-22. Board will be raised by 3.1% as per the CCC’s contract with Chartwells. Tuition and fees for Early College students will remain the same as last year.

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY SKILES to accept the tuition, fees, room and board rates for 2021-22.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Candace Walton gave a report on the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data (IPEDs). She provided information on CCC’s comparison group; enrollment measures; number of academic awards; tuition and required fees; and retention, graduation and transfer-out rates for first-time, full-time award-seeking students.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

  • Congratulations to the Foundation and CCC employees on the AMDT/welding donor tours on February 17 and the ribbon cutting on February 18.
  • COVID-related cases continue to be on the decline for both employees and students since the beginning of the semester and are greatly reduced since a high last November 2020.
  • Dr. Gotschall participated in the NCCA quarterly board meeting where they took positions on the Nebraska legislative bills that have been introduced. He provided written support for the Appropriations Committee regarding community college funding and attended the hearing on February 16, emailed and called area senators and Sen. Flood from the Revenue Committee regarding clarifications on CCC’s tax levy history and valuations, and attended the Nebraska Economic Development legislative priorities meeting.
  • He participated in the ACCT legislative conference sessions, which included multiple updates on the national legislative priorities of the new Biden Administration and Congress.
  • Last month, Central Community College received $4,636,930 as part of the latest federal stimulus bill from the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, (CRRSAA) 2020 for the Higher Education Emergency Relief Funding. At least $945,227 of that amount must be spent on student grants; the remaining amount may be used for other COVID-related expenses or lost revenue due to COVID-19. The financial aid office disbursed over $745,000 in direct aid to students this week (all low-income, Pell-eligible current students in good standing). Applications from a second or third tier of students will be reviewed with funds to go out once we get final guidelines from USDOE. Proposed changes by the Biden Administration to rules provided by the Trump Administration are causing some delays on confirmations. CCC administrators can submit proposals until March 1 regarding uses for the stimulus funds, which so far include additional remote instructional and proctoring software; employee compensation for adjuncts, extra days worked and faculty overload; lost revenue for adult education, community education and training and development; and informational technology switches, firewalls, security, IP classroom upgrades an employee training.
  • Dr. Gotschall participated in the Greater Nebraska Workforce Investment Board meetings on January 27-28 and continues to serve as the representative for educational providers seeking to assist dislocated workers, youth programming and services offered through the Nebraska Dept of Labor’s Workforce Development Centers.
  • The Nebraska Math Readiness initiative continues to grow with additional area schools and partners. The initiative addresses the math learning gaps of predominately high school seniors to make them less dependent on remedial math needs once they’ve graduated.
  • The Postsecondary International Network executive committee continues to plan for virtual webinars that will be held in conjunction with the World Federation Conference members. Major topics will include addressing leadership and best practices regarding COVID-19 responses, international education, student support and technology infrastructure.
  • Dr. Gotschall is continuing his involvement in Heartland United Way as president-elect. The organization supports Hall, Hamilton, Howard and Merrick counties and provides campaign updates, community investment, executive and finance committee meetings in addition to assisting with a monthly food distribution.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Borden requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY COWAN that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues. (Time: 2:35 p.m.)

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

John Novotny was unable to attend the executive session.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to return to the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting. (Time: 3:20 p.m.)

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY PIRNIE, SECONDED BY DAVIS to adjourn.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Borden declared the meeting adjourned at 3:21 p.m.

 

March 18, 2021

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
March 18, 2021

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sandra Borden called the March 18, 2021, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with 11 board members present. Board member Linda Aerni attended via teleconference.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present                                               

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Borden asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Linda Heiden will review the claims prior to the April 15, 2021, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Borden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for March 18, 2021.
  2. Minutes of the Feb. 18, 2021, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from Feb. 1 through Feb. 28, 2021, totaling $5,979,885.46.
  4. Financial report as of Feb. 28, 2021.
  5. Purchases:

    Administration Building Roof Replacement, Columbus
    : The College President recommends acceptance of the low bid from Tri-Cities Group in Grand Island for $103,300.00 to provide the labor and material for administration roof replacement on the Columbus Campus.

    Anatomage Tables for the Columbus, Grand Island, Hastings and Kearney
    : The College President recommends acceptance of this proposal from Anatomage Inc. with the technological help from SKC for $398,899.81.

    Data Center Network Refresh, Columbus and Grand Island: The College President recommends acceptance of the bids from Sirius Computer Solution Inc. in Omaha for $572,568.52.

    Dorm Wireless Refresh, Columbus and Hastings: The College President recommends acceptance of these bids for $124,806.10 to refresh (110) wireless devices in the Hastings and Columbus dorm locations and the bid from Riverside Technologies Inc. in Omaha for $241,045.00 to provide networking services on the Grand Island and Columbus data centers.
  6. Personnel: None

Davis reviewed the claims prior to the meeting and stated everything was in order.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Training and Development Report

Kelly Christensen, dean of training, gave an update on the training and development division.

  • The division relies on program income, which is used to provide business and industry workforce training, noncredit programming, trainers who are subject-matter experts, and GAP and Worker Training Program services through the Nebraska Department of Labor.
  • The division also includes leadership development, which offers training opportunities related to coaching essentials, communication skills, the Gallup StrengthsFinder, foundations of leadership and more.
  • Josh Brandt, industrial technology trainer and coordinator at the Lexington Center, and current participants Leroy Connor and Marcus Wilcox, shared information about the Tyson Meats Training Program. The program takes nine to 10 months to complete but employees who successfully complete the program see an hourly wage increase of $4. If these students decide to further their education at CCC, they can also earn credit for prior learning.
  • Doug Pauley, associate dean of training and development, gave an update on IMec 2.0, an Independent Mechatronics Education Curriculum Project. The project came about as part of a National Science Foundation grant in collaboration with South Central College in Minnesota and has heavily relied on CCC’s skilled and technical sciences division to help with creation. Beginning with the 2021 fall semester, the program will partner with six high schools in CCC’s service area but assumes exponential growth over the coming years.
  • Project PRIME: Plastics‐Related, Innovative Manufacturing Education looks to the science behind plastic molding. They have had donations from companies such as Molex, RJG and BD Medical.

Health Sciences Report

Sarah Kort, dean of health sciences, and Becky Fausett, Project HELP director, presented about Project HELP (Health Education Laddering Program), a federally funded grant program.

  • The program works with low-income individuals who want to get into health care.
  • Project HELP is celebrating 10 years at CCC. Across the state of Nebraska, there have been 3,288 participants, with 82% of those enrolled at CCC. (CCC was the only college offering the program the first five years.) About 315 health care employers have hired Project HELP participants.
  • “I am really grateful for the assistance I received from Project HELP and want as many students as possible to receive their support” – Amanda Rooker, past participant and current CCC nursing Instructor.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

There were no items to be brought to the board.

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Ron Kluck presented information about the Early College (dual-credit) program.

  • Key participants include area high schools and the Nebraska Department of Education as well as many CCC departments: registration, student accounts, deans and associate deans, and Extended Learning Services.
  • CCC has approved the credentials of 167 high school teachers to teach dual-credit courses. The Department of Education has certified 117 full-time CCC faculty to teach dual credit high school courses.
  • In the 2020-21 school year, 6,281 students are enrolled, up from 4,911 in 2017-18.
  • In the 2021 spring semester, students enrolled from 81 high schools within the CCC service area and 13 non-CCC Service area high schools. Twenty home-schooled students also enrolled.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following: 

  • The Grand Island Area Chamber of Commerce ribbon-cutting ceremony is set for March 26 at 11 a.m. for the Grand Island Campus’ Center for Health and Technology building. Tours and demonstrations also will be held.
  • COVID-related cases continue to decline for both employers and students compared to the beginning of the semester. Nearly 100% of the employees throughout our service area who wanted vaccinations have received the first dose.
  • I have been providing legislative updates as requested to Greg Adams with the Nebraska Community College Association, primarily concerning use of federal relief aid and tax-funded expenditures.
  • A sabbatical request from Allan Stenzel, mechatronics instructor in Columbus, was approved for the 2021 fall semester. His work will focus on multiple updates/videos of mechatronics concepts for use in courses and the federal iMec grant, meetings with business and other colleges with similar programs, and continuing education/professional development for him.
  • An agreement has been signed for completion of a CCC-Grand Island Entrepreneurship Center in downtown Grand Island. Remodeling of the space will begin soon.
  • CCC will receive an estimated $8,1766,000 as part of the recently passed American Recover Plan Act. Fifty percent ($4,088,000) is required to be spent on direct student aid and is available through September 2023. We’re still awaiting additional guidance from the U.S. Department of Education about institutional expenses and lost revenue allowances for these funds as well as the last CRRSAA relief funds awarded in January 2021.
  • Sarah Kort has been promoted from associate dean of health sciences to dean of health sciences.
  • Dr. Gotschall participated in a League for Innovation in Community College President’s webinar to exchange ideas concerning the pandemic and eventual post-pandemic changes. He is set to assume the board chair position of the Heartland Area United Way in April 2021. He has hosted virtual and in-person open forums for Hastings, Area Office and Columbus staff this semester and will meet with Grand Island staff later in March.
  • The $4 million fundraising goal was reached in the CCC-Columbus campaign. Construction continues to progress despite snow and rains.
  • Skilled and technical sciences instructors Laurel Bain, Renee DeWyke and Amy Stuart participated in a Women in STS presentation for the Grand Island Career Pathway programs.
  • The auto body program is expecting a record number of graduates and awards for the 2021 spring semester with 13 students set to graduate with associate of applied science degrees.
  • The construction technology and electrical technology programs have been identified as pilot programs for new apprenticeship models and will include streamlined efforts between faculty, industry, and state and federal apprenticeship administrators.
  • CCC counseling services is currently offering a support group for single parents. An LGBTQ+ support group will begin in late March via WebEx.
  • The Veterans Military Resource Center is adding a new flag and emblem due to the creation of the sixth U.S. branch of service, Space Force, that has been created and is headquartered in Alabama. Outreach to the County Veteran Services Officers (CVSOs) is underway with VRMC staff planning to visit all 25 counties to meet, network and leave promotional and support materials.
  • A virtual nursing job fair will be held March 18 with events planned throughout the day. A booklet of employers and employment opportunities will be shared in addition to video presentations, NCLEX application processes, ATI remediation and interviews. Ninety-eight new students have been accepted to begin the nursing program this fall.
  • Campus visits, new student orientation, registration days and other enrollment management events continue to occur in person and virtually. The scholarship deadline was March 1 with slightly fewer completed applications received.
  • In-person graduation ceremonies are being planned for Friday, May 7. Grand Island and Hastings commencements will both be held at the Heartland Events Center in Grand Island. The Grand Island ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. and the Hastings ceremony will begin at 2 p.m. The CCC-Columbus commencement will begin at 7 p.m. in the Raider Fieldhouse. The capacity at the Heartland Events Center will likely accommodate regular attendance crowds for both Hastings and Grand Island; at this time, we are considering reduced capacity in Columbus. Face coverings will be required for everyone attending commencement.
  • JBS has announced its Better Futures program, wherein JBS will pay tuition for either its employees or their family members at CCC. Courses at both the Grand Island and Hastings campus qualify as they are within 25 miles of a JBS plant.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Borden stated there was no need for an executive session.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY NOVOTNY to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Borden declared the meeting adjourned at 2:20 p.m.

 

April 15, 2021

Central Community College
Board of Governors' Meeting Minutes
April 15, 2021

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska. 

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sandra Borden called the April 15, 2021, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with 10 board members present. Board member John Novotny attended via teleconference as allowable by the governor’s executive order due to the pandemic.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Miller – absent
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Skiles – present                                               

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Borden asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Diane Keller will review the claims prior to the May 13, 2021, board meeting in Holdrege.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Borden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for April 15, 2021.
  2. Minutes of the March 18, 2021, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from March 1 through March 31, 2021, totaling $4,814,902.53.
  4. Financial report as of March 31, 2021.
  5. Purchases:
    Fiber System Expansion, Columbus: The College President recommends acceptance of the low bid from Commonwealth Electric in Columbus, Nebraska, for $365,865.00 to provide the labor and material for the fiber system expansion on the Columbus Campus.
    Greeley Window Replacement, Hastings: The College President recommends acceptance of the low bid from Carmichael Construction in Hastings, Nebraska, for $105,000.00 to provide the labor and materials for the Greeley window replacement on the Hastings Campus.
    Extended Learning Services Catalog Printing: The College President recommends acceptance of the quote from CopyCat Printing for $52,925.00 for printing the ELS catalogs.
  6. Personnel:
    Dr. Naa-Adjeley D. Ablorh: The College President recommends that Dr. Naa-Adjeley D. Ablorh be offered the position of chemistry instructor in Columbus, effective Aug. 1, 2021.
    Rebecca Wisdom: The College President recommends that Rebecca Wisdom be offered the position of nursing instructor in Grand Island, effective April 12, 2021.

Heiden reviewed the claims prior to the meeting and stated everything was in order.

MOVED BY HEIDEN, SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Skilled and Technical Sciences Report

Dr. Nate Allen, dean of skilled and technical sciences, introduced several individuals who shared information about their programs in the skilled and technical sciences division.

  • Associate dean Dan Gettinger and instructors Dan Davidchik and Jared Pettit spoke about iMEC 2.0, a project funded by a National Science Foundation grant. Through the program, CCC is working to increase the number of mechatronics and instrumentation technicians by bringing STEM coursework to students and teachers in rural high schools. Participating schools are Aurora, Axtell, Columbus Lakeview, Kearney, Lexington and Schuyler with the first 75 students beginning in 2021-22. CCC’s four classes will use a standardized format that includes lecture, lab, troubleshooting, homework and quizzes. South Central College in Minnesota is the grant lead college and partner in project.
  • Associate dean Mark Funkey, instructor Taylor Schneider and student Shea Peden spoke about the new energy technology program, which trains students in solar and wind power and battery storage. Schneider said having the wind turbine on campus has been essential for giving students practical experience in wind power. Peden, who will be graduating in the fall, shared his excitement for the energy technology program as well as Nebraska’s almost limitless capacity for solar and wind energy. Battery storage is so new that as of now, CCC is offering only an introductory and an advanced course.
  • Allen said the skilled and technical sciences division includes 15 programs in four industry sectors: construction, energy, manufacturing and transportation. There were 898 graduation awards in 2017‐18, 972 awards in 2018‐19 and 993 awards in 2019‐20. Students are in high demand and sometimes receive industry opportunities/employment before completing their associate of applied science degree.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Contract/Staff Wage Adjustment

The College President recommends approval of the following wages and benefits worksheet for full‐time salary and classified staff for 2021‐22:

  • Full-time classified and contracted employees retained for the 2021‐22 year will be eligible to receive a wage increase. An amount up to the equivalent of 3.5% of total wages will be set aside for compensation.
  • Employees hired after April 1, 2021 or salaried employees who exceed the current maximum rate for their grade will not be eligible for an increase. Salaried employees who will exceed the maximum rate as a result of the increase will be adjusted to the maximum rate. Hourly employees who have exceed their maximum rate for their grade will still be eligible for an increase of 1.25% of their current rate.
  • Health and dental insurance premiums are estimated to increase 2.96% over the next year. This equates to an increase of approximately $247,000.
  • All other benefits will remain in place without change. 

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the wages and benefits worksheet for full-time salary and classified staff for 2021-22.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – abstained
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Candace Walton reported on the performance of students with placement waivers and those without the waivers in selected English and math courses from the 2019 fall semester through the 2021 spring semester.

During this timeframe, 2,028 waivers were completed. It was discovered that in general:

  • English waiver students who completed remedial courses performed similarly to students who attempted the courses without a waiver.
  • English waiver students performed similarly with average success rates for 1000+ level English courses and in some cases outperformed the average for all students enrolled in those courses.
  • Math waiver students who completed developmental math courses outperformed the average grade received by CCC students in those courses.
  • Math waiver students outperformed the average grades received for all students enrolled in those courses.
  • During the COVID-19 pandemic, student enrollment and completion rates for both math and English changed. The most significant change was withdrawal from courses, potentially due to COVID issues. 

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • There was a great turnout for the Grand Island Chamber ribbon cutting for the Center for Health and Technical Sciences building. Both the Nebraska lieutenant governor and Grand Island chamber president were very complimentary and pleased with the tours and show of support from the community, faculty, students and employees.
  • We have been able to get additional students vaccinated area wide.
  • I continue to participate in AACC/ACCT updates related to federal stimulus funds, including the AACC Commission on Small and Rural Colleges. I also participated in the Higher Learning Commission annual president’s meeting.
  • As part of the federal stimulus funds, we have decided to provide an opportunity for up to five extra days of compensation for full-time employees (contract grade 8-11) and full-time faculty for documented pandemic-related work completed from March 13, 2020, through May 17, 2021. Hourly staff would have had all hours worked already compensated but will be getting up to $500 for additional expenses due to working remotely. I had been waiting on clarification from the U.S. Department of Education prior to sending out an application to all CCC full-time employees who may be eligible.
  • Representatives from the Haas Foundation were in Hastings April 12-13 to present a check for $250,000 toward the advanced manufacturing remodel and $30,000 toward student scholarships. Great work by many in making that happen.
  • CCC occupational therapy assistant students have been promoting an idea for an inclusive playground to be built in a Grand Island city park. Over 20 community members attended a session on April 13 to learn more.
  • For a variety of reasons, including the fact that mandatory assessment has been waived at CCC and other institutions for much of the past year, the College Cabinet approved changing the practice of mandatory assessment to recommended assessment to match the change to recommended placement made several years ago. Reducing this additional barrier to enrollment should allow more students to make decisions on enrollment and ultimately get into more of the classes they want to take while keeping general education communications and critical thinking competencies intact for graduation.
  • I enjoyed an excellent meal and hospitality as part of the Hastings graduate dining experience. I was very proud to share the success of the program with friends who purchased the dinner as part of the Taste of Columbus event and who are interested in further support of our culinary arts students and program.
  • The virtual nursing job fair was a success at College Park in March. Even though the employers joined virtually, students had opportunities to connect with them and learn about various health care facilities.
  • The admissions office partnered with Early College staff to go to the high schools to promote summer scholarships. These $250 scholarships go to current juniors and graduating seniors who want to take a summer class. The application deadline is April 15. Registration days are scheduled for spring and summer as well.
  • Students continue to seek individualized counseling sessions. Since the start of the spring semester, the counseling services office has provided 208 individualized counseling sessions to students. The most common concerns/diagnoses include stress, anxiety and depression.
  • Due to many businesses and four-year colleges being closed to visitors, the TRIO coordinators are planning an onsite career/transfer event. They will invite several local business representatives as well as transfer specialists from four-year colleges to attend a roundtable event for students this month.
  • On March 22, Ashley Weets invited all current University of Nebraska-Kearney/CCC pathway students (4 out of 5 showed up!) to a Pathway and Pizza event where they could enjoy some pizza and conversation about their pathway experiences. Tom Knott from UNK attended as well.
  • Conversations with GI Express are continuing as we explore a partnership with the truck driving program. GI Express is currently sending students through the six-week course. Matt McCann and Abie Ott continue to develop a refresher course in Canvas for an online completion of theory before completing about 10 hours of lab and driving refresher. A progress meeting was held April 7 with the online portion of the course scheduled to be ready by May 3 for students to enroll.
  • Members from BD Medical – Pharmaceutical Systems, BD Medical – Medication and Procedural Solutions, Hornady Manufacturing Company, and Parker Hannifin – Baldwin Filters recently visited programs in Columbus. These companies presented information on their plants, processes and career opportunities available to CCC graduates. All these businesses met with mechatronic students and faculty.
  • Welding faculty have been working with Timpte for an aluminum exchange. Timpte has been willing to provide scrap aluminum for the welding program to use. After the students weld on the scrap, it is returned to Timpte, and a new batch of scrap is acquired for students to use for practice welding.
  • Work continues on expanding apprenticeship opportunities with area employers, and we’re close to announcing the first registered apprenticeship in the next few weeks.
  • CCC-Kearney mechatronics instructor Jared Pettit was selected for the 2021 Dale P. Parnell Faculty Distinction Recognition from the American Association of Community Colleges. This national recognition has been established to recognize individuals who are making a difference in the classroom.
  • CCC is organizing an areawide Tree Campus Committee Group to help plan for the removal of dead trees, planting of new trees and overall tree health.
  • In-person graduation ceremonies are still on for May 7. The Grand Island and Hastings commencements will both be held at the Heartland Events Center in Grand Island with the Grand Island ceremony beginning at 10 a.m. and the Hastings ceremony beginning at 2 p.m. The CCC-Columbus commencement will be held at the Raider Fieldhouse at 7 p.m. Face coverings will be required for everyone attending commencement.
  • Ten employees have received the League Excellence Award from The League for Innovation in the Community College for demonstrating leadership and excellence in programming, research, grants, teaching and/or support for students. They are Barb Beck, Grand Island early childhood education instructor; Dan Davidchik, Columbus process controls and instrumentation instructor; Gene Friesen, Hastings drafting and design technology instructor; Yunteng He, Kearney chemistry instructor; Vicki Kucera, college financial aid services area director; Brian McDermott, college effectiveness and research director; Libby Paro, Grand Island occupational therapy assistant instructor; Jared Pettit, Kearney mechatronics instructor; Karin Rieger, Columbus associate dean of extended learning services; and Dr. Callie Watson, Grand Island occupational therapy assistant program director.
  •  Athletic Director Mary Young has been elected women’s senior administrator for the NJCAA Board of Regents. The board has 36 to 39 members from across the country.
  • CCC will be participating in the NJCAA’s eSports leisure league and is seeking internal candidates for a head coach and assistant coaches.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Borden stated there was no need for an executive session.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY PIRNIE to adjourn. 

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Miller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Borden declared the meeting adjourned at 2:19 p.m.

May 13, 2021

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
May 13, 2021

Public notice of the time and place of the Central Community College Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the CCC website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Central Community College Administration Board Room, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: https://meeting.sparqdata.com/Public/Organization/CCC.

Chair Sandra Borden called the May 13, 2021, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with nine board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Broekemier – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – absent
Keller – present (arrived at 1:05 p.m.)
Miller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – present 

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Austin Miller will review the claims prior to the June 17, 2021, board meeting in Holdrege.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Borden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for May 13, 2021.
  2. Minutes of the April 15, 2021, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from April 1 through April 30, 2021, totaling $7,035,191.27.
  4. Financial report as of April 30, 2021.
  5. Purchases:
    Administration and 100 Wing Roof Replacement: The College President recommends acceptance of the low bid from White Castle Roofing in Lincoln, Nebraska, for $406,100.00 to provide the labor and material for the Administration and 100 wing roof replacement on the Grand Island Campus.
    Exterior Monument Signs and Wayfinding: The College President recommends acceptance of the low bid from B-D Construction Inc. in Columbus, Nebraska, for $213,702.00 to provide the labor and material for the exterior monument signs and wayfinding on the Columbus Campus.
  6. Personnel: None.

MOVED BY AERNI, SECONDED BY MILLER to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – absent
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Student Success Report

Dr. Beth Przymus, dean of student success, and Chelsa Thompson, director of counseling and prevention education services, presented information about mental health services for CCC students.

CCC began offering individualized counseling sessions in 2014, using an external provider, started developing a framework for an on-campus counseling department in 2019 and launched CCC Counseling Services in 2020. Here’s what happened this past year in the four areas that comprise the department:

  • Prevention education: Activities included a mental health overview, Love your Selfie (self‐care tips), substance use awareness bean bag toss, alcohol and drug simulation activity and Relationship/Consent Jeopardy.
  • Consultation and collaborative services: Activities included explaining the counseling process, providing guidance in mental health-related situations, providing a team approach with other institutional departments and connecting students to the community resources they need.
  • Outreach and training: Activities included developing materials and guides for employees, resident assistant training, athletic training, and Covid‐19 and mental health support for employees.
  • Counseling services: Activities included group counseling and crisis intervention.

During 2020-21, 638 individual counseling sessions were held at CCC – 333 during the 2020 fall semester and 305 during the 2021 spring semester. The most prevalent diagnoses were depression, anxiety and adjustment/stress. A recent PBS survey found that 80% percent of college students reported COVID has had a negative impact on their mental health, spiritual health and career aspirations.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Audit Committee

Michelle Broekemier and Roger Davis were appointed to the audit committee.

Bereavement Policy

Dr. Waddle presented the following changes (the additions and deletions are italicized) to the bereavement leave policy and procedure:

Bereavement Leave Policy

Full-time employees are eligible for bereavement leave in the case of death in the immediate family.

Bereavement Leave Procedure

“Immediate family” shall include the following relationships: spouse, children, parents, siblings, father, mother, spouse, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, grandparents, and grandchildren. This includes the employee’s family, family of spouse, and step-families. The relationship of the deceased must be identified on the leave request. Bereavement leave shall not exceed five (5) days for a death in the “immediate family”.

“Extended family” shall include the following relationships: uncles, aunts, and cousins. This includes the employee’s family only (not family of spouses). Bereavement leave shall not exceed one (1) day for a death in the “extended family”.

Furthermore, bereavement leave may be granted for attendance at the funeral service of an active coworker employee at the College where there has been a personal friendship. The granting of this bereavement leave is subject to the supervisor's determination that the absence shall not create an interruption in essential work flow or services.

Bereavement leave may be used for pallbearer duties.

Bereavement leave shall not exceed three (3) days for any one death, without an extension approved by the President. Extended leave for an additional two (2) days may be approved by the President in cases of extreme need.

Proof of bereavement may be required by the College. Bereavement leave is with pay at the employee's regular rate of pay and shall not exceed more than a total of twelve ten (102) days in a fiscal year.

Skiles requested that the word “partner” also be included in the list of immediate family members.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY MILLER to approve the changes to the bereavement policy and procedure, with the addition of the word “partner” to the list of immediate family members.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Program Reviews

Program reviews were presented by Roxann Holliday, dean of business and entrepreneurship, for the agricultural services and information technology and systems programs, and by Sarah Kort, dean of health occupations, for the health information management services. Upon board approval, these programs will be submitted to the Nebraska Coordinating Commission on Postsecondary Education.

MOVED BY AERNI, SECONDED BY KELLER to approve the program reviews for the agricultural services, health information management services, and information technology and systems programs.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • There were great turnouts for the three commencement ceremonies on Friday, May 7. Over 1,025 students were eligible to participate due to earning a diploma or degree within the past year, and almost 450 chose to participate. I’m very pleased with the celebrations, outstanding alumni recognitions and participation.
  • As we finished the 2021 spring semester, we had 140 students reported with COVID-19 concerns (testing, symptoms, quarantines, monitoring, etc.) that resulted in additional interactions with CCC student services staff. This compares to over 800 during the 2020 fall semester, so a positive trend downward.
  • On May 10, 2021, Central Community College was named the top community college in the state of Nebraska for online learning by premiumschools.org. This was an unsolicited award but one that I feel our faculty, support services, faculty support and IT services do deserve!
  • I met with the other community college presidents on May 3 for the NCCA trustee meeting in Lincoln as well as another higher education president’s meeting hosted this past week by NU President Ted Carter that included other state college and university administrators.
  • Due to delays in the U.S. census and the likely need to redraw and approve our community college district lines, we may need to meet in person or via WebEx in December. Once we get specific deadlines and release of information from the Secretary of State’s office, we will know more. We cannot look at our boundaries until the state first confirms state legislative districts. District populations should be equal (generally defined as within 10%).
  • Skilled and Technical Sciences “signing days” were held in Grand Island, Columbus and Hastings with over 100 new freshmen participating. We received very positive feedback from students, parents and employer sponsors who assisted with the event. Next year plans are to include business and health programs too.
  • We received notice May 11 that our American Recovery Plan funds were awarded so we now have access to another $4,239,649 minimum to be used for student financial aid assistance and $3,879,179 in institutional funds for coronavirus relief. The total from this third round equals $8,118,828. The award notes we have until January 15, 2022, to spend the fund, though no cost extensions are available up to one year which would put it to January 2023. Some initial reports said it would be available through September 2023, but know they are encouraging the dollars be spent sooner rather than later to assist in recovery efforts.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Borden requested an executive session to discuss personnel.

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY COWAN that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues. (Time: 2:42 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY AERNI to return to the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting. (Time: 3:30 p.m.)

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Broekemier – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – absent
Keller – aye
Miller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Borden declared the meeting adjourned at 3:33 p.m.