How Can We Prevent Sexual Harassment and Violence from Happening?

What can I do as an upstander?

In 1964, Kitty Genovese was raped and murdered while 38 men and women stood by and did nothing to help. Often bystanders or witnesses to sexual violence and harassment feel scared, alone and afraid to say or do anything. 
Source: NSVRC Engaging Bystanders in Sexual Violence Prevention

YOU have the ability to begin changing cultural norms and acceptance of sexual harassment and violence.

YOU have the ability influence others around you to feel responsible and competent in intervening.

YOU have the ability to be a role model for helping others.

  1. Notice the Event
  2. Interpret it as a Problem
  3. Take Responsibility for Acting
  4. Decide How to Act
  5. Choose to Act

Reduce your risk

While victim-blaming is never appropriate and Central Community College fully recognizes that only those who commit sexual misconduct are responsible for their actions, CCC provides the following suggestions to help individuals reduce their risk of being victimized and their risk of committing acts of sexual misconduct.

Bystanders

  • Don’t mind your own business.
  • Explore the following types of abuse so you can better identify it: emotional, verbal, stalking, financial, physical, sexual and digital abuse.
  • Look for warning signs of abuse.
  • Err on the side of caution.
  • Alert authority figure/police as needed.
  • Put yourself in their shoes.
  • Reach out, be supportive, listen and acknowledge their feelings.
  • Connect them with resources.

Victims

  • Create a safety plan at Love is Respect Safety Planning.
  • Build a support system at home, work and school and in your community.
  • Know your social networks.
  • Update your privacy settings.
  • Set boundaries.
  • Recognize the cycle of violence: tension>incident>reconciliation> calm>tension.
  • Keep detailed documentation.
  • Explore the following types of abuse so you can better identify it: emotional, verbal, stalking, financial, physical, sexual and digital abuse.

Abusers

  • Explore the following types of abuse so you can better identify it: emotional, verbal, stalking, financial, physical, sexual and digital abuse.
  • Recognize the cycle of violence: tension>incident> reconciliation>calm>tension.
  • Admit the behavior is wrong.
  • Take responsibility for the problem and get help.
  • With help, you can learn how to treat others with respect.
  • Always ask for consent.

Obstacles to Seeking Help

These include shame, embarrassment, fear, believing abuse is normal, low self-esteem, lack of money, nowhere to go, pregnancy/parenting, distrust of police, language barriers/immigration status, social/peer pressure and cultural/religious reasons.

Relationship Rights

  • Right to live free from violence and abuse
  • Right to feel safe and respected
  • Right to say NO
  • Right to privacy, online and offline
  • Right to do things you enjoy
  • Right to end a relationship

Programs

Primary Prevention

Incoming students are provided with education and training on awareness and risk reduction of sexual, dating and intimate partner violence; stalking; and consent in compliance with the Violence Against Women Act and the Clery Act.

Bystander Intervention

The college offers bystander intervention programming in an effort to ensure that each member of the campus community is invested in creating a safe campus environment for themselves and others. Program participants are instructed on safe options for preventing harm and intervening when a risk of sexual misconduct exists.

Ongoing Campaigns

Ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns are provided throughout the school year to students, faculty and staff.

Mobile Apps

Circle of 6

 

DoD Safe Helpline

 

My Plan